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finger limes

 
gardener
Posts: 813
Location: Galicia, Spain zone 9a
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I have just come across something called a finger lime with caviar fleash that tastes of lime in a little pickle sized fruit thingy, in one of the seed catalogues.  It says it is semi tropical and likes partial shade. good for the top of my field I thought, but wanted to check out if anyone knows anything about this fruit and whether partial shade means dappled or full sun all morning, full shade all afternoon.  Perhaps under one of aour apple trees in a sunnier spot?  We are a mutant 9a here.
 
Posts: 525
Location: Australia, New South Wales. Köppen: Cfa (Humid Subtropical), USDA: 10/11
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Hello Mandy,

I have one, they're an Australian native and typically grow in a subtropical rainforest as an understory plant.

So, they like dappled sunlight and enough water to just keep them moist, good mulch.

Note: they have a LOT of sharp thorns. Keeping them out of the wind will prevent the fruit getting spiked.

Unlike normal citrus, they only need a bit of fertiliser, worm castings and fish/seaweed emulsion are very useful in this regard.

There are a variety of cultivars on different rootstock - some produce green, pink, champagne coloured pearls. The pearls explode a very refreshing citrus juice when crunched.

Hope this helps.
 
Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
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Location: Galicia, Spain zone 9a
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Excellent info. Thank you!
 
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