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What's the BEST (sweetest) tasting PawPaw?

 
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I would like to buy a few Paw Paws.  I don't have a lot of space to devote to them, so I want them to be as sweet as possible (I don't like tart fruit) and good tasting.  What's the recommendation?
 
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T.J. Stewart wrote:I would like to buy a few Paw Paws.  I don't have a lot of space to devote to them, so I want them to be as sweet as possible (I don't like tart fruit) and good tasting.  What's the recommendation?



Cultivated paw paws have a wide range of flavor and texture profiles. On the one end there is nearly white flesh with simple sweet tones, and on the other nearly orange colored flesh with rich complex aromatic notes. Everybody has their preferred spectrum, I’m the kind of guy who loves fruits like durian so I prefer the richer complex cultivars. Cultivars on the sweeter end are: Shenandoah, Mango, and Sue. Cultivars on the richer side: Susquehanna, PA Golden, and Sunflower.
A sweet spot in the middle is Allegheny. I delve into cultivars flavors size productivity etc in the book.

For tight spaces you can plant two saplings in the same hole and let them grow out as “one” tree, they will work it out and cross pollinate each other.
 
T.J. Stewart
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Thanks for pointing me in the right direction.  I hope to be able to check your book out soon! :)
 
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