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Chemicals in linseed oil

 
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Hello,
We are looking into doing an earthen floor with radiant heat in a 1386square foot house. The natural linseed oil prices are insane ($1600-4500+shipping!), whereas if i could get boiled linseed oil (with the chemical solvents) It would cost around $550. I am all about less chemicals of course but this is such a drastic difference... for oil 🙄. does the hazard of chemicals linger around for awhile or mostly just during dry time? What would YOU do if this was your house? Or maybe I am missing a more frugal source to buy the oil? Any thoughts or feedback is appreciated! Thank you
 
steward
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how much are you talking about? I've seen raw linseed oil for about the same price as boiled. it won't be organic, but it won't have the toxic hardeners in it that cheap boiled linseed oil does.
 
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There are a lot of different things called "linseed oil" (some are also called flax oil).

Some are foodsafe but expencive.
Some have solvents and other chemicals
some are the same as foodsafe oil but not certified foodsafe
some are boiled
some are boiled with solvents
some are boiled with beeswax
...
and about two dozen other kinds.

I think the choice of linseed oil depends more on what you want to achieve.  You probably don't need foodsafe oil if it's not being used on something you are going to eat or put food on.  So that eliminates the most expensive linseed oil.  

What are the things you want the linseed oil to do to the floor?  oxidize and waterproof?  
 
Theresa Lantz-Huffman
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Were looking at needing about 32 gallons to cover 1386 square feet with 4 coats.  The linseed oil is pretty crucial for the floor to be durable and waterproof. Its what seals it all together. If i purchased RAW then the drying time is extremely long to wait in between each coat and not very practical. There are options for polymerized linseed oil that does not contain all the added chemicals but still has a faster drying but thats where the price jumps high.
 
pollinator
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My first thought was 'boil it yourself!', so I looked that up and it is apparently not as simple as I hoped, since it's really more in the nature of heating it in order to dissolve the added drying agents...

But, then I found this blog post about using diatomaceous earth to convert raw linseed oil to a faster drying pseudo-boiled version, which sounds super neat..

http://www.fullchisel.com/blog/?p=1637


In other posts, he also talks about allowing the oil to stand in a glass jar exposed to sunlight, to start it polymerizing, and then using this oil as an additive to raw oil to hasten drying.
 
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I just did the oiling on our new earthen floors and we used regular boiled linseed oil from Home Depot. We are on day 9 and the odor it puts off is seriously horrible. When I am in the house my eyes burn, I get a headache almost immediately, and I start to feel sick. So, if you do the regular boiled linseed oil then prepare to not be in there for at least 2 weeks.
 
pollinator
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I’m wondering if regular old Linoleum, now being manufactured as Marmoleum, would be a good choice for floors. It does need a smooth surface to lay on or all irregularities will transmit through it and be visible (I’ve seen old linoleum on wood floors where the planks show through).

Linoleum, commonly shortened to lino, is a floor covering made from materials such as solidified linseed oil (linoxyn), pine resin, ground cork dust, sawdust, and mineral fillers such as calcium carbonate, most commonly on a burlap or canvas backing. Pigments are often added to the materials to create the desired colour finish.

 
Theresa Lantz-Huffman
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oh yikes! I used the sunnyside oil this summer just to oil some boards outside and thought it didn't smell strong at all (i have a really sensitive nose too).. so was excited that I could just use that.. thats such a bummer, why does there have to be so many chemicals in everything 🙄... are you able to keep your windows open at all? thank you for the heads up, i sure appreciate it..keep us updated if you can.
 
tel jetson
steward
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even straight linseed oil has a pretty strong smell as it cures that a lot of people find unpleasant.
 
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