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best rabbit breed for meat and heat tolerance

 
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Hello all. Iam interested in growing meat rabbits for the first time. I need something heat tolerant. What breed would you suggest? Iam completely new at this and am learning any other information and recipes would be great. Thanks.
 
pollinator
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Welcome, Silvanus.

Without knowing where you are, I suggest you take a look at what rabbits are being raised successfully and without a lot of air conditioning in your area. If you can't find anyone doing it and you are in a warmer climate, it is possible that it is too hot for rabbits.

Most rabbits' ideal outdoor temperature range is between 12 C to 21 C, about 55 to 70 degrees, and will withstand temperatures up to 30 C, about 85 degrees, but anything above that increases the chances of heat stroke.

I have heard that Californians are good, and Cali NZ crosses, and that there are breeders working towards heat tolerance, but I think it's mostly self-preservation.

I have also heard that things like keeping them out of direct sunlight does wonders (they need light, but not direct sunlight, so if they can get away from it at need, all the better), and that radiant barrier is truly game-changing, and has the same thermal effect as a concrete slab when standing under it. Keeping a patch of ground from getting any solar gain at all would keep it relatively cool.

Looking forward to some good answers in this space. Let us know how you proceed, and good luck.

-CK
 
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We always had New Zealand does with a California buck. They stayed in a building with no heat/cooling and they always did fine. We live in the Midwest where summer temps are routinely 85+ F everyday with humidity. We just keep a fan on them in the summer.
 
Silvanus Rempel
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I live in Mississippi. It's usually hot and humid or wet and mild. Actually I ain't seen a patch of dry ground since NovemberšŸ˜ But I do have plenty large pecan trees for shade.
 
pollinator
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Brazilian rabbits and TAMUKs are both able to handle heat better than most breeds. Brazilians can handle a lot of humidity, too. I have no idea if the TAMUKs can.
 
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