• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Dave Burton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Ash Jackson
  • Kate Downham

Maximillian Sunflower Question

 
Posts: 10
2
forest garden pig
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello - this is a loaded question but I'm wondering if anyone has had trouble "controlling" Helianthus maximiliani.

Some background: I don't necessarily buy in to all of the "invasive" labels on plants. I love some of the local "invasives" like autumn/Russian olive, while I agree with others like the callery pear. In our area (midwest) and specifically in my county due to the terrain, invasive plants are part of the landscape and some can seriously take over and be very aggressive like multiflora rose.

I am considering the maximillian sunflower as a part of a site wide strategy for moving deer along certain paths away from our guilds and to build some natural fencing.  I love the characteristics of this plant but I'm wondering if perhaps it might end up being a challenge to contain. Given it's allelopathic properties I can imagine several areas where I wouldn't want these guys to take over. They would be perennial here in our zone 6. I understand they're shallow rooted so removal might not be too difficult but we've had other issues with birds "planting" lots of sunflowers that have been a real headache.

Looking for some words of wisdom as it seems like this plant is used quite a bit in guilds. If you could, include your zone/region so I can have some idea of how it might compare locally. Thanks!
 
master steward
Posts: 3941
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1155
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Scott Stowers wrote: I am considering the maximillian sunflower as a part of a site wide strategy for moving deer along certain paths away from our guilds and to build some natural fencing.  I love the characteristics of this plant but I'm wondering if perhaps it might end up being a challenge to contain. Given it's allelopathic properties I can imagine several areas where I wouldn't want these guys to take over. They would be perennial here in our zone 6. I understand they're shallow rooted so removal might not be too difficult but we've had other issues with birds "planting" lots of sunflowers that have been a real headache.

Looking for some words of wisdom as it seems like this plant is used quite a bit in guilds. If you could, include your zone/region so I can have some idea of how it might compare locally. Thanks!



We grew Black seed sunflowers so those are the only one I am familiar with.  If the results we had are an indication of your results, all I can say is "Deer love sunflowers!"  So you strategy might work.
 
pollinator
Posts: 637
Location: Montana
217
forest garden trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My experience with Maximillian is that it is pretty well behaved.

Helianthus grosseserratus and good old sunchokes are a little weedier than Maximillian. It makes a nice tight clump and pretty much stays where planted. Of course I am a bit North and West of its native range and you may be in the native range.

If later you find you need something a bit more aggressive you could try sunchokes.
 
Posts: 22
Location: 5000' Albuquerque, NM
11
hugelkultur forest garden building rocket stoves woodworking greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In zone 7, Maximillian thrives along our irrigation ditches. It needs extra water (more than our 12" per year). It does not thrive without sun. To stop the growth, prevent water or sun from reaching it. The rhizomes transplant easily and live just below the soil surface so are easily moved and divided. The long stems are useful for weaving into hugelkultur systems, wattle and daub structures, or small fences. The wintering finches love the seeds. The Maximillian mulch is useful in water conservation in the garden and under trees. I like this plant very much for its beauty and many uses. I don't have a deer problem so cannot speak to that.
Enjoy this wonderful plant.
Amy
gift
 
Rocket Mass Heater Plans: Annex 6" L-shaped Bench by Ernie and Erica
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic