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Trying to grow Dwarf Lake Iris (Iris Lacustris)

 
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I live in Michigan, and the dwarf lake iris is our state wildflower. Although it grows mainly around the great lakes, I thought I may have some luck if I plant them outside near an inland lake. I planned on starting the seeds inside for a while, although I'm not sure for how long yet. Since I seem to have a hard time finding information about growing this flower, I was wondering if anyone has had any experience, or at least something comparative.
 
josh davis
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I got the seeds today. I decided I would soak them in water for about a week, and I'll probably wrap the seeds in some damp paper towel and put it in the fridge for ~6 weeks. I think this strategy will hopefully yield good germination. It's not really an ideal time to plant or else I would probably just leave them in a pot outside during the actual winter.

BTW the seeds are from plant-world-seeds which is in the UK. Pretty hard to find seeds for this particular iris.



 
josh davis
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Well I let the seeds soak for a week, changed the water most every day. I think they absorbed water, all but 4/30 had sunk by the end of the week. Wrapped them in some moist paper tower, then some aluminum foil, and put it in the fridge. I’ll check on them every so often but I don’t really expect roots for maybe 5 weeks.
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pollinator
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Not familiar with that specific plant , but iris spread well by clumping.

Grab a root nodule of an existing stand and plant it. I suspect it would much easier than by seed.
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Clump
Clump
 
josh davis
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J Davis wrote:Not familiar with that specific plant , but iris spread well by clumping.

Grab a root nodule of an existing stand and plant it. I suspect it would much easier than by seed.



Thanks, I will keep that in mind when planting.

Unfortunately I can’t make a cutting from a root nodule as these iris are both pretty difficult to find and do not grow naturally in my part of the state. If all goes well then I will definitely use cuttings in the future.
 
josh davis
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Well I learned that Iris Lacustris, as well as Cristata I believe, do not actually need cold stratification. So I’m hoping the refrigeration will just have acted as some overwintering and that the seeds will still germinate. I wish I had just planted them earlier.

I moved them into small peat pots and I’m putting them outside. Hopefully within a week or two I see some appear. I had a couple extras that are in an indoors seedling tray.
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Josh,
From the Michigan Nature Association I find this to be key-“They grow on sand or thin soil over limestone rich gravel or bedrock.”
I have no experience growing this plant, though I did get to see this threatened plant a few years ago in its native habitat.
I assume getting the right alkalinity along with maintaining proper water level are the limiting factors for this threatened plant.
 
pollinator
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sounds like good drainage and a sandier potting mix that doesn't hold so much water might help.
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