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Using corrugated tin roofing to cover/prep soil

 
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Hi All!

I'm new into permaculture and starting out my first test plot (about 10' deep, 30' wide).  The land was used as a traditional organic farm plowed under every year but has good soil.  When I inherited the plot it was covered in grass, a fava bean cover crop and a few other leftover crops (kale going to seed, dead basil).  I mowed everything and wanted to cover as much as I could to help keep it clear of other plants growing and help the green mulch from the mow decompose before planting more. I don't have much cardboard but I cleared 2 small areas, planted a nectarine and asian pear tree and surrounded each with the cardboard I had (6'x6' around each tree).  I covered the rest of the plot with a bunch of extra corrugated tin roofing panels.  I watered the whole area before covering but am wondering what you all think about the metal roofing's ability to get too hot and cook everything in the soil?

I am located near Grass Valley CA.  Hardiness zone 7.  Average temperatures for April are 64° / 40° and May is 72° / 47°.  The garden is in full sun.

Thoughts?
 
pollinator
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Location: North Carolina zone 7
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Good evening. I think it’s a great idea. Solarization works!
 
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I once used plexiglass over burr clover in a lawn. It burned out the weeds and composted them too. The grass encroached in.

I don't know if metal would work since light can't get in to solarize.  But the shade might starve the weeds out.  I'm in central Texas.
I'd be interested in your results as I have lots of tin roofing too.

-TheRainHarvester on YouTube
 
pollinator
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Location: the mountains of western nc
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i've used roofing tin to smother out weeds a few times. i agree, i don't think they actually solarize, but they will shade out what's under them. they can also hide whole rodent civilizations if they stay in place long enough.
 
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Location: Zone 9 - Sacramento, CA
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Nicholas Hughes wrote:I covered the rest of the plot with a bunch of extra corrugated tin roofing panels.  I watered the whole area before covering but am wondering what you all think about the metal roofing's ability to get too hot and cook everything in the soil?

I am located near Grass Valley CA.  Hardiness zone 7.  Average temperatures for April are 64° / 40° and May is 72° / 47°.  The garden is in full sun.

Thoughts?



I grew organic veggies gardens in a similar area of CA for many years and am now located nearby in Sac but am in 9a zone. My main concern is that it won't get hot enough to destroy the weeds. Because the land has been organically maintained (virgin to harsh pesticides and herbicides) there is going to be heavy weed pressure. I always ran into very heavy weed pressure in the foot hills and giving the weeds a wet, shaded place to grow (even if it does get very hot) would have made my plot explode with weeds. My particular concern would be those like Bermuda grass which require very little light and have amazingly deep roots that deplete soil and are extremely competitive.

Also - rodents, as mentioned. Giving them shelter might cause problems later.

Have you seen heavy weed pressure on the plot? Any evidence of rodents?

If so, might consider a sheet mulch with cardboard instead. It's not an ideal time to find place with cardboard but furniture stores and grocery stores are always abundant (if you can find one open right now).

I'm interested in your experiment.
 
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