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garden border plants and couch grass defense

 
Sasa Milicevic
Posts: 7
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here the situation....

my garden is bordering with a lawn orchard that's rarely mown and maintained. that means couch grass has started to invade my turf. i removed most of it with a garden fork and elbow grease and now i'm contemplating which plants to plant to stop the invasion from happening again. that area is mostly shaded in the afternoon and I have some tayberries and blackberries near it.

i was thinking of a combination of mint, com/frey and nettles would keep the dreaded couch grass at bay, provide some nice ground cover and usable mulch material. or would some wild strawberries be a safer option than mint. maybe just a simple mixture of green manure would be enough? or maybe there's something entirely better?
 
Rob Sigg
Posts: 715
Location: PA-Zone 6
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I am kinda in the same situation. I tried strawberries and clover, oregano and thyme. Its too soon to tell if its working or not. I did have to put down a 2 foot wide strip of black plastic in between things to keep them from creeping into each other, but this is probably not an ideal situation.
 
Eric Thompson
Posts: 365
Location: Bothell, WA - USA
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White clover works great for me in this area. I use living mulch of white clover in raised beds too, so when I need to distub it to plant seeds like carrots, I pull off a "carpet strip " of white clover and lay it along a border area somewhere else where I need it -- a strip of clover carpet will root easily and hold its own against grass.
Comfrey will do fine too (even better!), but that's probably overkill unless you really want comfrey there.
Clover is easier to repel if it starts invading your beds and only gets 6 inches high or so..
 
Alex Ames
Posts: 393
Location: Georgia
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Eric Thompson wrote:White clover works great for me in this area. I use living mulch of white clover in raised beds too, so when I need to distub it to plant seeds like carrots, I pull off a "carpet strip " of white clover and lay it along a border area somewhere else where I need it -- a strip of clover carpet will root easily and hold its own against grass.
Comfrey will do fine too (even better!), but that's probably overkill unless you really want comfrey there.
Clover is easier to repel if it starts invading your beds and only gets 6 inches high or so..


Ditto on the mint. It gets away and will soon be everywhere.
 
Rob Sigg
Posts: 715
Location: PA-Zone 6
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its worth mentioning that I have native red clover as ground cover, it just showed up. I think white clover would be better because its easier to remove if Im not mistaken.
 
Sasa Milicevic
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white clover it is...

I will intersperse some wild flower seeds as its a border area so it looks nicer
 
Kota Dubois
Posts: 171
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I've had daffodils act as a barrier to the most expansive plants, raspberries and Annabelle hydrangeas, for two. I've not tried it for couch grass , but since it's shallow rooted I'd give it a go.
 
I agree. Here's the link: https://richsoil.com/wood-heat.jsp
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