• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Pearl Sutton
  • James Freyr
stewards:
  • Burra Maluca
  • Mike Haasl
  • Joylynn Hardesty
master gardeners:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • thomas rubino
  • Jay Angler
  • Tereza Okava

Houston, TX cob house building

 
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
New to permies

is there any Houstonion with cob house?
 
pollinator
Posts: 325
Location: Central Texas zone 8a, 800 chill hours 28 blessed inches of rain
36
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sheldon,

Welcome to Permies!  Houston does not have a lot of natural building.  A lot or reasons for that, but in regards to Cob, keep in mind that the soil in that area is mostly 'expansive soil'.  A cob house is going to move a lot, even on a good perimeter foundation.  

Austin has some cob projects.  There was/is even a venue (weddings/parties, etc...) with a cob hall to rent, although that has been a few years back.  I don't know if they are still in business.
 
Sheldon Josh
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jack Edmondson wrote:Sheldon,

Welcome to Permies!  Houston does not have a lot of natural building.  A lot or reasons for that, but in regards to Cob, keep in mind that the soil in that area is mostly 'expansive soil'.  A cob house is going to move a lot, even on a good perimeter foundation.  

Austin has some cob projects.  There was/is even a venue (weddings/parties, etc...) with a cob hall to rent, although that has been a few years back.  I don't know if they are still in business.



Thanks jack, will research more on this. is it entire Houston and suburb or Houston + 50 or 100 miles radius?
 
Jack Edmondson
pollinator
Posts: 325
Location: Central Texas zone 8a, 800 chill hours 28 blessed inches of rain
36
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Most of the Upper Texas Gulf Coast has "gumbo soil" which is expansive by nature.  There are pockets of soil that are not predominantly expansive.  I know that NW of Houston as you get up to Hempstead (out 290 past the flood plain) that area is a high sand content and not expansive.  I have posted this link before, but I find it helpful for a bunch of reasons.  The University of California Davis has an interactive map of the US that shows soil type.  Pick a location on the map, click on the location, and a soil profile will appear on the left margin.  Click on the primary soil type and click on the box for linear extension.  The 'question mark' will give a technical definition of linear extension and show the categories.  Basically it is the measure of shrink-swell of soil as it hydrates/dehydrates.  The more expansion and contraction the more foundation problems you will encounter.  

UC Davis - soil web

It is helpful to see the different soils in an area.  It will also answer your question more specifically.  It will also show the percentage of clay, sand, and organic matter in a local soil type, which helps to see if there is enough clay to do cob with on site material or if it will have to be brought in.  
 
Who knew that furniture could be so violent? Put this tiny ad out there to see what happens:
Abundance on Dry Land, documentary, streaming
https://permies.com/t/143525/videos/Abundance-Dry-Land-documentary-streaming
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic