• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • jordan barton
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Greg Martin
  • Steve Thorn
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Leigh Tate
  • Mike Haasl
master gardeners:
  • John F Dean
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Stacie Kim
  • Jay Angler

Hilly mountain to capture rainwater?

 
pollinator
Posts: 311
Location: Nevada
13
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am looking at some land in the desert that is very hilly.  It is about 6,000 feet up, so high to begin with.  Out of 10 acres, there is probably 3 that are reasonably flat.  If I buy land like this, I was thinking I could use some of the inclines, hills and small valleys as natural collection "panels" and aquifers to direct water to where I want it for household use.  My first thought would be to try to develop some really healthy ground cover on the slopes to hold the soil in place.  Any thoughts about doing this?
 
pollinator
Posts: 11809
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
1116
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The best resource I have found for water-harvesting structures is Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands Volume 2 by Brad Lancaster.  An absolutely indispensable book in my opinion.

https://www.harvestingrainwater.com/

With the right topography, groundwater can be completely restored in 7-10 years.

 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 11809
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
1116
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Geoff Lawton's Jordan videos are helpful.  As with all permaculture projects, it's best to start work close to the house site and design out from there, especially if you want to bring extra water to the house site.

 
pollinator
Posts: 2266
Location: Bendigo , Australia
141
dog gear plumbing earthworks bee building homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Is it practical in that area to collect rainwater off the roof and store it in tanks.
If you have 20,000L tanks no treatment will be needed.
Its something I deal with all the time in Australia, but I am not familiar with your geography and its weather.

I notice East Nevada may get 10 inches of rain a year.
If you had a roof of 100m2, that would give you 20,000L per annum.
Would that be enough?
 
Tom Connolly
pollinator
Posts: 311
Location: Nevada
13
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

John C Daley wrote:Is it practical in that area to collect rainwater off the roof and store it in tanks.
If you have 20,000L tanks no treatment will be needed.
Its something I deal with all the time in Australia, but I am not familiar with your geography and its weather.

I notice East Nevada may get 10 inches of rain a year.
If you had a roof of 100m2, that would give you 20,000L per annum.
Would that be enough?



Thanks for your thoughts.  If I were building a free standing home, that would not be a problem for living purposes.  I hope (dream) to have a green house growing veggies hydroponically, so that will up the H20 requirements a bit.  Also, one of the reason why I am looking for hilly land is to be able to build a house into the side of the hill and take advantage of the thermal mass that offers....I still may need a utility building, which might fulfill the need...and the greenhouse also.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 11809
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
1116
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What they call a "pole barn" here is a super useful structure which you might consider building fairly soon into the project to provide yourself with a source of household water in tanks.  You can camp under the pole barn while you're building your house.  Rain tanks won't be sufficient to irrigate with much - our neighbors have a 20,000 gallon rain tank which they empty almost instantly once they start using it for irrigation - but rain tanks are wonderful to have as a source for household water.
 
Think of how stupid the average person is. And how half of them are stupider than that. - Carlin But who reads this tiny ad?
Permaculture Voices 1, 2 and 3 - all 117 hours of video!
https://permies.com/t/voices123
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic