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Lime supplier

 
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Location: Brown County, Indiana 6a
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Hi, I am in the planning stages of building a rammed earth house and have been working to source lime for stabilization and plaster and ran across Mississippi Lime and was wondering if anyone had gotten quicklime from them before? I know of the dangers of quicklime, but with hydraulic lime both expensive and scarce in North America slaking my own is the next best thing. If anyone has other suppliers they have dealt with you could point me to that would also be great.
 
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Location: Yukon Territory, Canada. Zone 1a
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I'm going to follow this thread as I've been hunting for s type lime for a while now. I can't seem to source it at all.
Sorry to not be a help to you, but I'm glad to know someone else here will be getting experience with slaking.
Let's both be sure to post our experiences when the projects begin!
 
Chris Sturgeon
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Gabe. I found a type-s lime made in Wisconsin. The nearest supplier is in Edmonton; still over 1000km away from me so even driving down to get it will be an expensive endeavour. Hope this helps you find a local supplier near you!
https://piranhastucco.com/product/hydrated-lime-type-s/
 
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Location: Fennville MI
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I am also interested in finding a source for quicklime, as we're going to be lime plastering a strawbale home at some point in the next couple of years ;)  Mississippi Lime looks like the best lead I've heard about in my searching.

I'm confused about difficulty finding type S lime, as it's a common product carried at places like Home Depot.
 
Chris Sturgeon
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Hi Peter, Yes. And the Nearest Lowes/Home-despot/Rona is 1000km away in Edmonton! My reading has me thinking that Type-s with an added pozzolan will work for my plastering needs, but true quicklime would be better. A common pozzolan is brick dust, but again no source here, so I may divert some of my bio-char production and use charcoal to do the job.

I'm now thinking that it may be easier to find some local limestone and make my own true quicklime in a homemade cob kiln. Or very slowly in my paint-can retort that I use in my woodstove for charcoal.

 
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