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Identification help  RSS feed

 
Jonathon Coombes
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I came across some of these underneath a single pine tree at my friend house in the suburbs.
It appears to be a Boletus of some form, although the stem does not have that bulbous appearance, their is no staining blue-green and the top does not appear to be dark enough for slippery jacks.
Anyone have some help, they were found in Hunter Valley of NSW, Australia in case that has an impact.
fungi1.jpg
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Fungi cut in halft
fungi2.jpg
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View of underside
 
M.K. Dorje
Posts: 153
Location: Orgyen
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Although I am not familiar with the fungi of your region, I would guess that this mushroom is a member of the Suillus genus, which includes the Slippery Jack and many other related species. A close up of the top of the cap might help narrow it down a bit more.
 
Jonathon Coombes
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Sorry for the delay, here are some of the photos of the tops.
fungi_top1.jpg
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Top of fungi
fungi_top2.jpg
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Another top shot
 
Jonathon Coombes
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Well, after much research and examination of the fungi at the front of the house, I have come to the conclusion that it is a form of slippery jack know as suillus granulatus.
I have picked a large amount here as the lawn is about to be mown, so I will be taking the usual approach and skinning and drying them for later cooking.
I love the fact that I didn't even have to go to a pine forest, just go out the front door and see them springing up everywhere under the pine tree in the front yard!
Thanks for the help, and if anyone thinks differently, please let me know
 
M.K. Dorje
Posts: 153
Location: Orgyen
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They certainly do look a lot like Suillus granulatus, a species also common in the western United States. It is described as "edible, but bland" in "Mushrooms Demystified", although I've never tried it.
 
Jonathon Coombes
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Thanks for the help M.K.
After reading up on it further, it appears the preferred way to use them is to remove the gills and top "skin" and then dehydrate them.
Later they can be rehydrated for soups, stews etc and are apparently quite good that way. I guess even better if mixed with other types as well
 
Janos Vajda
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Though I am unfamiliar with mushrooms in Australia, there are no known deadly toxic boletus. There are boletus that will make you sick. But nothing that will kill you. For a mushroom, that's pretty friendly in my book, as something like a destroying angel will liquify your liver in 3 days - no cure. Polypores are my favorite kind of mushrooms, as they are among the most forgiving and safest should you end up making a misidentification.
 
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