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This is a badge bit (BB) that is part of the PEP curriculum.  Completing this BB is part of getting the sand badge in Foraging.

Foraging is like gardening but without all the planting, weeding, nibbler protection or watering.  If you live in the country there are lots of road sides to search.  These must be wild foods - not gleaning or harvesting from an actively cultivated space.

Plant identification is the most important part of foraging.  Get one or two good books on the edibles of your region.  Be sure you know what you're picking!

To complete this BB, the minimum requirements are:
Prepare a dish (soup, salad, entree, side, etc.) that uses at least a cup of one of:
- dandelion (blossoms or leaves)
- wild mushrooms (must be cooked)
- nettles
- miner's lettuce
- lambs quarter
- purslane
- acorns (must be prepared properly)
- burdock root (must be cooked)
- chickweed
- wild sorrel
- red-root amaranth (pigweed)
- watercress
- rose hips

To document your completion of the BB, provide the following:
 - A picture of one of the plants in the wild
 - A picture of obviously more than a cup of foraged ingredients (or pic of the ingredients in a measuring cup)
 - A picture of the finished dish
 - A description of what the dish is

Clarifications:
 - This is "Foraging" so the plants can not be cultivated by you.
COMMENTS:
 
pollinator
Posts: 187
Location: South Central Kansas
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Laetiporus Sulpherous, the delicious Chicken of the Woods.  This time 'round we made a gravy and doused it over fried eggs.  Also delicious in curry.  I pickled some in ACV that are . . . interesting . . . but I haven't figured out how to use them yet.
Chicken-of-the-Woods.png
chicken of the woods
chicken of the woods
chicken-of-the-woods-cut.png
chicken of the woods cut
chicken of the woods cut
chicken-of-the-woods-gravy.png
chicken of the woods gravy
chicken of the woods gravy
Staff note (Mike Haasl) :

I certify this BB complete

 
pollinator
Posts: 158
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The PEP event crew went for a stroll to the creek sfter a woodland care sesh and looked around for some food. Mostly on the hunt for Morels but surrounded by a variety of greens. Miner's lettuce, Sorrel, Fire weed, Dandelions and Violets. I harvested Miner's lettuce. This simple dish was made up of Miner's lettuce, Raisins, Sunflower seeds, juice of 1/3 lemon and some pepper. Delecious
miner-s-lettuce.jpg
miner's lettuce
miner's lettuce
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harvested miner's lettuce
harvested miner's lettuce
20190523_180206.jpg
miner's lettuce
miner's lettuce
20190523_180650.jpg
miner's lettuce salad
miner's lettuce salad
Staff note (Nicole Alderman) :

I hereby certify that this Badge Bit is completed!

 
pollinator
Posts: 585
Location: Near Missoula, MT
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- A picture of one of the plants in the wild

miner's lettuce

- A picture of obviously more than a cup of foraged ingredients (or pic of the ingredients in a measuring cup)


- A picture of the finished dish

A miner's lettuce salad with dandelion flowerand wild violet flower.  
Staff note (Nicole Alderman) :

I hereby certify that this Badge Bit is completed!

 
pollinator
Posts: 123
Location: Zone 9A, 45S 168E, 329m Queenstown, NZ
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Watercress soup with homegrown potatoes and garlic
20190323_143936.jpg
watercress
watercress
20180925_193914.jpg
soup ingredients
soup ingredients
20180925_193919.jpg
potatoes peeled
potatoes peeled
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washed watercress
washed watercress
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watercress soup
watercress soup
Staff note (Mike Haasl) :

I certify this BB complete!

 
Posts: 8
8
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Miner's lettuce, sheep sorrel, and a few violets for a foraged salad.
IMG_1155.jpg
foraging for a salad
foraging for a salad
foraged-miner-s-lettuce-salad.jpeg
foraged miner's lettuce salad
foraged miner's lettuce salad
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foraged miner's lettuce salad
foraged miner's lettuce salad
Staff note (Nicole Alderman) :

I hereby certify that this Badge Bit is completed!

 
pioneer
Posts: 214
Location: California Coastal range
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I harvested wild greens for tonight's stir fry:  sorrel, wild radish leaves and Malva.

image.jpeg
foraged sorrel, wild radish leaves and Malva
foraged sorrel, wild radish leaves and Malva
image.jpeg
wild radish
wild radish
Malva.jpeg
Malva
Malva
image.jpeg
foraged sorrel, wild radish leaves and Malva
foraged sorrel, wild radish leaves and Malva
image.jpeg
foraged sorrel, wild radish leaves and Malva salad
foraged sorrel, wild radish leaves and Malva salad
image.jpeg
foraged sorrel, wild radish leaves and Malva salad
foraged sorrel, wild radish leaves and Malva salad
Staff note (Nicole Alderman) :

I certify that the badge bit is complete!

 
Posts: 73
Location: Ant Village
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I gathered some miner's lettuce to make a salad. It took a while to gather this much since there wasn't very much where I went and I didn't want to harvest too much of any patch I found. I also grabbed a bit of wild sorrel on my way back. The salad was dressed with balsamic vinegar.
IMG_20190522_113537.jpg
miner's lettuce
miner's lettuce
IMG_20190522_121936.jpg
miner's lettuce
miner's lettuce
IMG_20190522_123456.jpg
miner's lettuce salad
miner's lettuce salad
Staff note (Nicole Alderman) :

I certify that the badge bit is complete!

 
master steward
Posts: 14242
Location: Pacific Northwest
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Discovered I still had some nettles that hadn't gone to seed. Happy day! Harvested the few good leaves (bugs love them this time of the year) and cooked them up in some butter. Kids devoured them and I got a few bites.
20190902_165617-1-.jpg
nettle patch
nettle patch
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foraged nettles
foraged nettles
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sauted nettles
sauted nettles
20190831_191805-1-.jpg
Nettles and Liver
Nettles and Liver
20190831_191613-1-.jpg
Nettles dish
Nettles dish
Staff note (Steve Thorn) :

I certify that this BB is complete!

 
master steward
Posts: 8691
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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I foraged up a salad today.  I bet it would've tasted better if I did it back in May.  It was amazing to see the volume of wild edible greens living in our field food forest open spaces.  I picked some amaranth (weed) in the garden, sheep sorrel, wood sorrel and red amaranth in the food forest and dandelion from the yard.  The red amaranth came in as a weed in a transplant and has spread into our field (uncultivated).

To this I added some cherry tomatoes, broccoli florets and homemade chipotle maple syrup dressing.
sheep-sorrel.jpg
sheep sorrel
sheep sorrel
harvested-wild-greens.jpg
harvested wild greens
harvested wild greens
wild-greens-salad.jpg
wild greens salad
wild greens salad
Staff note (Nicole Alderman) :

I certify that this BB is complete!

 
Nicole Alderman
master steward
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About a week ago, I cooked up some more nettle. Yum!

They're cooked in butter with a little bit of salt added at the end.
20190921_184040.jpg
fresh nettles, just into the pan
fresh nettles, just into the pan
20190921_190456.jpg
All cooked up, and devoured in minutes!
All cooked up, and devoured in minutes!
Staff note (Mike Haasl) :

I hereby certify this BB complete (plant photo is higher up in this post)

 
gardener
Posts: 362
Location: In view of the Chiricahua Mountains, AZ
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I'd like to propose a change to the plant list.  None of those plants grow in the very arid desert where I am, except the rare purslane or pigweed - mostly in parking lots - and a tiny bit of nettle in the oasis parks, where it's not allowed to be picked in most areas.

Could things like cactus, mesquite, edible succulents, etc be included?  There are also desert mustards here, but because they are considered invasive, a lot of them are sprayed.  So care is needed there...
 
Mike Haasl
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Hi Kim, the list is oriented towards plants that are roughly available in Paul's part of the world.  Sometimes similar plants from elsewhere sneak into the list but I'm not sure if arid desert plants fit the bill.
 
Posts: 56
Location: Western Oregon (Willamette Valley), 8a/8b
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For lunch today, I made an omelette with foraged miner's lettuce, chickweed, wild garlic, and eggs from our hens.

The miner's lettuce is starting to take off for the spring. I find the best spots in our woodland tend to be by the base of oak trees on the southern side. I'm careful to cut only some of the leaves from each plant and not disturb the basal rosette.


Wild garlic grows happily under the pines and black walnuts.


Some nice big claytonia!




Wilted the greens on their own, whisked up 6 chicken eggs in a bowl with a dash of seasoning salt, pulled greens off skillet, poured in eggs and then dropped wilted greens back on top, and let cook until the omelette could be flipped, cooked just a moment more and then served. The only thing used from off the farm was the seasoning salt.


Lunch for two. Not the best job of plating here, but it tasted lovely.


edit - It looks like the images are working from my end, but in case they aren't for others, I'm adding them as attachments as well - I hope this works.



foraged-greens.jpg
foraged greens
foraged greens
ingredients.jpg
ingredients
ingredients
omelette-no-fromage.jpg
omelette no fromage
omelette no fromage
wild-claytonia-etc.jpg
wild claytonia
wild claytonia
wild-garlic.jpg
wild garlic
wild garlic
Staff note (Mike Haasl) :

I certify this BB complete!

 
Posts: 76
Location: Portugal
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Today's lunch consisted of fried chouriço, onion and lambs' quarters (aka fat hen, white goosefoot, chenopodium album).  The fat hen is added after the chouriço and onion have fried 'til mostly cooked, then cooked just for a couple minutes longer.  The "mash" is yellow dried split peas, cooked in some chicken stock and garnished with fresh parsley from the garden.  Jolly tasty it was too!  

For added permie-brownie-points, it was cooked in my iron skillet, which, from what i could tell researching the patent numbers which are cast into it, is likely about 100 years old.  I bought it for 50p in a yard sale 10+ years ago.
IMG_20200705_082940-1-.jpg
fat hen (lambs' quarters etc) plant which contributed some of its leaves
fat hen (lambs' quarters etc) plant which contributed some of its leaves
106929900_863099377433292_7913749386232206615_n.jpg
the harvested fat hen
the harvested fat hen
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leaves removed ready for cooking...
leaves removed ready for cooking...
106911884_676110156304084_19581558186857951_n.jpg
... and put in a handy measuring jug. Approx half a liter by volume.
... and put in a handy measuring jug. Approx half a liter by volume.
IMG_20200705_120535-1-.jpg
Finished dish ready to serve!
Finished dish ready to serve!
Staff note (Mike Haasl) :

I hereby certify this BB complete!

 
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We have had an abundance of chanterelles lately with all of the rain and heat.  My 12-year-old daughter and I have been enjoying our time harvesting and thinking up meals.  She made pan fried chanterelles with a dandelion butter sauce served over potatoes and I made chanterelle fried rice served with cucumber salad.  This was a fun one!
IMG_20200701_113020699.jpg
In the wild
In the wild
IMG_20200701_113149006.jpg
A super unique one
A super unique one
IMG_20200628_114315087.jpg
Her creation
Her creation
IMG_20200703_124043184.jpg
And my chanterelle fried rice
And my chanterelle fried rice
Staff note (Nicole Alderman) :

I hereby certify that this badge bit is complete! And, since it's you now have a completed Badge Bit in the Foraging badge, I'm granting you the Foraging air badge, too!

 
pollinator
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Chickweed foraged and added to a vegetable barley soup.

I ended up picking from 3 separate areas as they were all a bit small and it is sort of late for chickweed here.
20200807_182409.jpg
Patch one of chickweed before forage
Patch one of chickweed before forage
20200807_182439.jpg
Parch one after forage
Parch one after forage
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Patch two before forage
Patch two before forage
20200807_182540.jpg
Patch two after forage
Patch two after forage
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Patch 3 before forage
Patch 3 before forage
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Patch 3 after forage
Patch 3 after forage
20200807_182709.jpg
In measuring cup
In measuring cup
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In the soup
In the soup
20200807_192316.jpg
Final dish
Final dish
Staff note (Mike Haasl) :

I certify this BB complete!

 
Mike Haasl
master steward
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Are those chickweed truly wild or are they accidentally living in a garden and encouraged to live there?  And or cultivated?  If the wood chips are a public space, then I'd say this counts.  But if they're allowed volunteers or wild plants allowed to live in a cultivated garden/landscape, I think it doesn't quite meet the Foraging guidelines.
 
Penny McLoughlin
pollinator
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Hmm, I don't consider them cultivated I guess. I don't do anything for them like water them or such.

They are at the very edge of my managed space/yard but I think they were there before I threw down the wood chips and just grew through it?

Your call. I have some more growing under some trees but these were closer to the house so I grabbed them instead.
 
Mike Haasl
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A little birdie just told me that if they show up on their own in a garden without being introduced, it counts as foraged.  
 
Penny McLoughlin
pollinator
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Sweet.

Thanks
 
gardener
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Location: Durham, NC
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Hello, I made a dandelion salad.  I started by foraging a cup of wild dandelion leaves.  I also foraged some clover leaves/flowers and mock strawberry leaves to counteract the bitterness of the dandelion.  I added a few shreds of red malabar spinach and purslane from my garden, then dressed it with a chocolate vinagrette (chocolate almond milk, olive oil, seasoned rice vinegar, and a dash or seasoned salt).   If I were not meeting the specs of this BB, I would probably do half a cup of dandelion and half a cup of clover to even the bitterness out.









Staff note (Mike Haasl) :

I certify this BB complete, along with your new Air badge in foraging!

 
author & gardener
Posts: 498
Location: Southeastern U.S. - Zone 7b
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Yesterday, I found this in our back yard.

Hen in the Woods wild mushroom


It's Hen in the Woods, kin to Chicken in the Woods but not as colorful. I harvested some to saute for dinner. Happily, I had just looked over the requirements for the foraging badge, so I remembered to take pictures for this BB!

I picked about a half bowlful.


Slicing the washed mushrooms.


Sauteed in a little olive oil and Himilayan salt.


We ate it as a side dish. Very tasty.
Staff note (Mike Haasl) :

I certify this BB complete!

Staff note (Mike Haasl) :

And another air badge for you!

 
Rob Lineberger
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Leigh Tate wrote:Yesterday, I found this ....

It's Hen in the Woods, kin to Chicken in the Woods but not as colorful. I harvested some to saute for dinner. Happily, I had just looked over the requirements for the foraging badge, so I remembered to take pictures.

We ate it as a side dish. Very tasty.



You're much braver than I am.   I see mushrooms and evaluate it something like this: is it a mushroom? Yes. Run away!

Anyway, assuming I did ever forage this hen of the woods, does it release moisture the same way button mushrooms do?
 
Leigh Tate
author & gardener
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Rob Lineberger wrote:
You're much braver than I am.   I see mushrooms and evaluate it something like this: is it a mushroom? Yes. Run away!

Anyway, assuming I did ever forage this hen of the woods, does it release moisture the same way button mushrooms do?


Rob, I know how you feel! I looked up how to ID and also if it could be confused with other mushrooms. Yes, it does release moisture like button mushrooms. I just keep cooking until the mushroom water cooks out of the pan.
 
gardener & author
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Cream of nettle soup. Made by sautéing an onion in butter, adding some parsnip or potato and plenty of chicken broth, simmering it until the parsnip is tender, then cooking the nettles in it for 5 minutes before adding milk and blending it with an immersion blender.
_A095803.JPG
Nettles growing wild
Nettles growing wild
_A095805-harvesting-nettles.JPG
Nettles in cup
Nettles in cup
75_A095832-nettle-soup.jpg
Cream of nettle soup
Cream of nettle soup
Staff note (Mike Haasl) :

I certify this BB complete! If you are to BB10, feel free to request that in the "Bragging about BB5/10/20" thread.

 
Posts: 27
Location: Gloucestershire, UK
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We had some foraged nettles for lunch in a hot quinoa salad. Along with the rinsed nettles, I added a diced carrot and small summer squash and stock powder. My husband said it could do with some fresh herbs and lemon juice next time.  
nettle_harvest.jpg
Harvesting nettles
nettle_meal.jpg
hot quinoa salad
nettle_patch.jpg
nettles
Staff note (Ash Jackson) :

I certify this BB complete!

 
pollinator
Posts: 272
Location: Chicago
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I used lamb's quarters to make a "spinach" lasagna.

Here are the three plants in situ:



One heaping cup of leaves:


One baked lasagna:
Staff note (Mike Barkley) :

I certify this BB is complete.

Staff note (Rob Lineberger) :

MK the dish looks great. This is the foraging aspect so it can't come from a cultivated space. As a fellow urban permaculturist I've faced the same issue.

 
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