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Two established hives free: Minneapolis, MN

 
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We are camping on a property with honey bees, and have just found that the "bee-keeper" kills the bees when it gets too cold to keep them.
He'll just purchase new hives next spring. I'm horrified by this!
Thought I'd make an effort to find them a good home.
Especially since there's such a shortage of honey bees in the world.
 
pollinator
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Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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It sounds like he was spending more money on buying toxic gunk. Than it cost to just buy new bee.
 
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Joy Yumi wrote:We are camping on a property with honey bees, and have just found that the "bee-keeper" kills the bees when it gets too cold to keep them.
He'll just purchase new hives next spring. I'm horrified by this!
Thought I'd make an effort to find them a good home.
Especially since there's such a shortage of honey bees in the world.



Can't take them myself - our state has some sort of license requirement I still need to look into - but this one definitely caught my eye. Hopefully someone in the area will be able to help.

 
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He probably isn't going to give his hives away, so I don't know how someone would remove the bees.
 
S Bengi
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One would most likely have to swap out the frames.

As long as you aren't crossing state lines, I think you might be able to keep bees without much worry
https://www.beelab.umn.edu/resources-beekeepers/ordinances

And if you are only keep 3 or so hives, you can probably get away with it, keeping bees. And even if they somehow wrote you up for it, you would just have to pay a $50 fine.  
Even within Boston, MA city limits anyone can keep 2 bee hives with no registration required by the gov.
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