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Huglekultur

 
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I just started a bed about 12x10ft with plenty of organic matter but I didn’t dig the ditch to put it in. I have some time before I can plant it full of plants for this fall here so would sprinkling some wheat grass or something similar to start breaking down the organic matter help? And chop it down before I plant then a layer of compost before I plant seeds.
 
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I suggest nitrogen fixing plants like clover & legumes.
 
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Hi Andrew, and welcome to Permies!  I agree with Mike that nitrogen fixers are a good choice.  You can mix pretty much whatever you want but the nitrogen fixers help everything else that comes after.  

What is your climate like?  People may be able to give you more specific advice if they know what you're dealing with.

Congrats on the hugelkultur, by the way.
 
Andrew Penny
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Timothy Markus wrote:Hi Andrew, and welcome to Permies!  I agree with Mike that nitrogen fixers are a good choice.  You can mix pretty much whatever you want but the nitrogen fixers help everything else that comes after.  

What is your climate like?  People may be able to give you more specific advice if they know what you're dealing with.

Congrats on the hugelkultur, by the way.


I’m in zone 9b Right in central Florida. It’s just starting to cool off. So would a bunch of bush bean plants be a good idea?
 
Timothy Markus
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Sorry, Andrew, but I don't know what to plant in your area.  I'm sure someone will come along who knows what would work in your case.
 
Mike Barkley
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Bush beans might survive winter in central Fla. Maybe, not real sure. Fava beans tolerate cold better. I had some survive all last winter & they were one of the first things harvested in spring. Why not try both?
 
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