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Manure for fuel AND fertilizer

 
Posts: 1502
Location: Chihuahua Desert
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This is an interesting article: http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/hooker87.html

Basically, the guy uses manure as a renewable fuel for his wood burning stove. No surprise there. He claims the manure bricks burn better than oak of a similar size, which I find a bit suspect, but I do know that manure does burn well.

The surprise comes from the value of the ash as a fertilizer. Apparently, it does better than the original manure. Now, I know this isn't definitive, and hardly scientific, but it is interesting.

Any thoughts on this? Anyone done this?
 
Posts: 6
Location: Salida, Colorado Zone 4
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Manure bricks are made and used all over Nepal as a very good source of heat for cooking.
 
Abe Connally
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Location: Chihuahua Desert
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yeah, I know manure is a decent fuel, about 6,000 BTU per lb uncompressed. If you compress it a bit, you could achieve more BTU (oak, I think is around 8,000 btu per lb)

but, I'm curious about the fertilizer aspect, that sounds interesting.

Some manure might be better than others. Goat, sheep, and rabbits produce pellets, so that is kinda handy. They also tend to dry faster.
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