I just dropped the price of
the permaculture playing cards
for a wee bit.

 

 

uses include:
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- convincing folks that you are not crazy
- gift giving obligations
- stocking stuffer
- gambling distraction
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Scythe Reviews  RSS feed

 
Posts: 38
Location: Charlotte, NC
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I am trying to do some research on which scythe to buy and which snath (handle) to buy. I think I have narrowed it down to an Austrian blade and a snath that handles are adjustable, but that's as far I have got.

Does anyone have suggestions for which type and company I should consider purchasing for tall grasses, mainly non woody stems?



In my research I have found this arcticle which was helpful for those who are on the same journey: http://www.themodernhomestead.us/article/Scythe.html

Here are some vendors:
  • http://www.johnnyseeds.com
  • http://www.leevalley.com
  • http://www.lehmans.com
  • http://www.themaruggcompany.com
  • http://www.onescytherevolution.com
  • http://scytheconnection.com
  • http://www.scythesupply.com
  • http://scytheworks.ca

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    Posts: 26
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    We have bought 3 scythes from scythesupply in Maine. They make the snathe for your size.

    Dave Rogers
     
    Posts: 159
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    Scythe supply, follwed by onescytherevolution....the others..not so much, I have heard bad things about marugg...and lehman's, well, they are not going to fit your snath for you...
     
    Ryan Mitchell
    Posts: 38
    Location: Charlotte, NC
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    I am glad to see 2 votes for scythe Supply, they are who I went with. I got their outfit/kit: scythe, snath, stone, stone holder, pening jig, and a how to book for $190
     
    Posts: 147
    Location: Zone Five, B.C., Western Canada.
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    Good to know. I need to buy a new one or just fix the old one I have. It's been bushwackin' heavy on my property.
     
    pollinator
    Posts: 308
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    If you're in Canada, Scythe Works is excellent...great quality, very knowledgeable...will get you set up so your scythe matches your body...
    I bet you are almost neighbours...
     
    Posts: 3
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    I bought my first scythe from Lee Valley and I've been very happy with it. I also have a bush scythe from scythe supply and contrary to everyone else I'm not so happy with it. I find the wooden snath less comfortable and the hand holds keep popping out. I do put it to some pretty heavy work - mainly keeping blackberry thickets under control but I find it annoying that they tend to blame the customer for the hand hold problem. I prefer the aluminum snath. It's adjustable and just more comfortable for me.
     
    Posts: 6
    Location: Northern Michigan
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    Allie Green wrote: I also have a bush scythe from scythe supply and contrary to everyone else I'm not so happy with it. I find the wooden snath less comfortable and the hand holds keep popping out. I do put it to some pretty heavy work - mainly keeping blackberry thickets under control but I find it annoying that they tend to blame the customer for the hand hold problem. I prefer the aluminum snath. It's adjustable and just more comfortable for me.


    When you say popping out, do you mean from your hands or that the handle actually pops off of the snath?
     
    Allie Green
    Posts: 3
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    To Matthew: The stem of the hand hold pops out of the snath and I have to reglue it. It's not a big deal - just a nuisance.
     
    Matthew Farnsworth
    Posts: 6
    Location: Northern Michigan
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    That sounds like a glue issue, not a scythe supply issue. I used a good waterproof glue and had no problems even when i bent the blade.
     
    Ryan Mitchell
    Posts: 38
    Location: Charlotte, NC
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    Just a follow up to my earlier post:

    I am glad to see 2 votes for scythe Supply, they are who I went with. I got their outfit/kit: scythe, snath, stone, stone holder, pening jig, and a how to book for $190


    I have used the Scythe I got from them several times and like it a lot. Once you get the hang of the motion you can move right a long. For full disclosure, this can be hard work, you are moving your whole body with it and you'll have to take some breaks. I wouldn't have to mow a large lawn or field with this, but to clear some fence line, knock down some tall grass or make limited quantities of hay this will work well. The grass after this will be somewhat rough so this is more utilitarian than anything, for areas where I'd like to have a "lawn" , I'm still going to use a lawn mower
     
    Posts: 213
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    Friends don't let friends use ScytheSupply snaths. The best source for a European style scythe is ScytheWorks of Canada, followed by One Scythe Revolution. For the American pattern (ideal for challenging mowing conditions like uneven ground or tall dense growth) then I professionally restore vintage examples. It's not the back-breaking monster it's made out to be--you just use it differently.

    Rise-ShineScythe_RestorationMontage.JPG
    [Thumbnail for Rise-ShineScythe_RestorationMontage.JPG]
    A restoration done for a friend of mine
    RestorationComparison.jpg
    [Thumbnail for RestorationComparison.jpg]
    One of my personal units.
     
    Posts: 344
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    WOW AMAZING RESTORATION!!!
    How did you do the snath?
    What did you treat and sharpen the blade with?
     
    Benjamin Bouchard
    Posts: 213
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    The snath was stripped of its hardware, then sanded, primed, and painted. It was one of those rare examples I consider of already good dimension so it didn't need further reduction. The hardware and blade were all given electrolytic rust removal treatment, then wirebrushed down to the bright bare metal. The blade had the tang heated with an induction heater at the shank, which was then bent to proper angulation for my use and biometrics (the tool is expensive for anyone not doing as many blades as I do--a DIY'er can use a MAP torch with a raw potato stuck on the edge to prevent overheating from heat spread) and the edge was given a proper hollow grind on a slow-speed wet grinder to restore the bevel geometry. The edge was then honed to quite literally hair-shaving sharpness and then the iron hardware remounted on the snath and the whole thing given a few clear coats of lacquer to prevent wear and/or rusting and to give a nice glossy finish. Here's a piece I'm whipping up now for my friend Botan Anderson at One Scythe Revolution as part of our "cultural scythe exchange" project.

    This puppy only weighs 1lb 4oz without the hardware, which is light for an American. I could probably go thinner but he'll be using it for demos so the untrained might damage it if I went thinner. The snath is a Seymour Ironclad with swing socket.

     
    Posts: 171
    Location: western n.c.
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    ok, you seem to really know what you're doing! Would you care to take the time to explain how one "fits" this whole thing to their body and mechanics? I understand that's alot to ask, just thought it was worth a shot
     
    Benjamin Bouchard
    Posts: 213
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    The method for fitting the nibs (grips) that I like to use is to stand bolt upright and hold the snath vertically against the body with the large end on the ground right next to your leg. The upper nib will be positioned level to or about one inch above the armpit. The lower nib will then be positioned one cubit (span of elbow to outstretched fingertip) down from that. Rotate the nib positions so that the lower nib is pretty much between the 8 and 9 o'clock position and the upper nib is between the 9 and 10 o'clock position. Further adjustments will be made over time, but that's a good starting point to work from. HERE is a guide I've written on the subject. I need to make a few minor revisions as it's a constantly evolving and growing document but it'll give you the bulk of the basics of tuning and adjustment.

    Bear in mind that while I have a lot of info on the subject I'm learning new stuff all the time and I'm bound to need to correct myself from time to time as I unearth better information. I'm the only fellow I know of actively researching the American scythe at this point in time, though I've met and heard from many who either still do or used to mow with one and enjoyed themselves as much as I do, quite contrary to what many would have the current scythe-buying public believe.
     
    Let's get him boys! We'll make him read this tiny ad!
    Rocket Canner Fryer and Forge - Draft Plans
    https://permies.com/t/64465/Rocket-Canner-Fryer-Forge-Draft
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