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Using ashes

 
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Location: Linneus, Me.
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So I have a question about using the ashes that accumulate from using a woodstove every day and nearly all day.  I live in a very old small farm house that sits on a foundation of large rocks.  It is like something between a crawl space and a cellar, that is, it has about five feet height.  The 'floor' is just packed dirt.  I am putting in a woodstove above this 'basement' and I want to have an ash drop down into the basement.  My question is: can I just spread the ashes out on the floor and let them get worn into the dirt over time?  I think we generate about three metal trash cans' worth of ashes over the winter.  Maybe four.  It is not any big deal to haul them up and out in the spring, but if I can do without an extra task, then I would want to.
 
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If you ever need to go under there, it will be a dust-nightmare I think.  I also don't think they are going to go anywhere, I think you are going to have a 5 foot deep ash pit under your house.
 
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If it were my home, I would have three metal trash cans sitting in the area you are talking about for the ashes that way this you save on having to shovel the ashes in the spring. Another benefit is that the ashes will help control humidity in that area.

Another idea would be to spread the ashes on your driveway to melt the snow. In the spring the ashes will clean up oil stains.

In the spring those ashes will have some great uses like adding to garden beds, compost piles, etc.

Wood ashes will control snails and ants if you put a ring of ash around plants.

 
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