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Guild list for south of Provo, UT zone 5a  RSS feed

 
Tony Bigler
Posts: 2
Location: North Central Utah
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I'd like to put together a list of edible plants for some permaculture guilds that would work in the area just south of Provo, Utah. I'd rather not reinvent the wheel if there's someone out there that has already done some legwork in this regard. I've tried doing web searches for guild lists for this area, but have found nothing. The region I'll be working in is Hardiness zone 5a. Rainfall averages around 2 inches per month, but it frequently goes longer than a month with no precipitation (0 inches) in the summer.

If you're living in or lived in this area and have a list of what works, or know where I can find a list like that, please let me know. Otherwise, I may have to start trial-and-error from scratch, which I'd really like to avoid. Thanks.
 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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These are not specifically 'guilds', but are guides specific to your region.

The first deals with the native pollinators and the native plants they target:
http://pollinator.org/PDFs/Guides/IntermtSemiDsrtDesertrx4FINAL.pdf

The next is a guide put out by the DNR to promote plantings favorable to native wildlife:
http://wildlife.utah.gov/publications/pdf/landscapingforwildlife.pdf

Though these are not specifically what you are looking for, they should be very beneficial to creating a food forest that should be well balanced for your ecozone.

Also, the Rockies forum here at permies will put you in contact with members living in your region.

 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
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check out the plant list on my blog, it is zone 4/5, slightly colder than your area, so all the plants should work for your area...see blog link in my address and then click on the plant lists.
 
Tony Bigler
Posts: 2
Location: North Central Utah
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Thanks for the replies.

@John Polk:
Thanks for those two links. Although not quite what I'm looking for, they are very interesting, especially the "Landscaping for Wildlife" one.

@Brenda Groth:
Thanks for the link to your blog. It does sound like there are some similarities in our Hardiness Zones, however, after looking at your photos, it appears your area has significantly more moisture than mine.

I'll be checking out the "Rockies" section of the forum. From a casual perusal, I don't spot any other central Utahns right off, but maybe I just need to dig around more.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
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you are probably right..we have a combination of flood and drought here most of the time. Our lower areas are constantly moist, and our raised areas are mostly very dry to droughty..so a lot of my plants are growing in the wetter lower areas which is true.
 
Ann Torrence
steward
Posts: 1191
Location: Torrey, UT; 6,840'/2085m; 7.5" precip; 125 frost-free days
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bee books chicken duck goat trees
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What altitude? We are at 6800' and can grow tomatoes. Our neighbors upstream at 7100' cannot, so it makes a huge difference. Even though we are supposedly in zone 6a, I use zone 5 for trees, zone 6 for smaller shrubs that I can afford to experiment with. Most of my gardening experience is in SLC, first year growing here, differences noticed so far is that things are slower to take off. One new peach tree sat for over 2 months before putting out a single leaf, then caught up to the others in three weeks.

Water quantity is probably going to limit our choices more than winter hardiness, at least until your trees start affecting the microclimate.

This drought is not making it very easy on our new trees, mostly heritage apple.

 
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