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Can a pluot act as a pollinizer for a Shiro plum tree?

 
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I have a Shiro plum I planted last year. I am not sure I have space for a another Asian plum. I did get a pluot tree this year. Will that work as a pollinizer?
 
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In general they should, and you probably won't have an issue. Sometimes certain varieties won't pollinate each other though, and if you know the names of the varieties that you have, you can check a pollination chart like this one that lists both varieties to be sure they will pollinate each other.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.burntridgenursery.com/text/Plumpollinationchart.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwjI-vzqrIHvAhVGMlkFHU_wBSkQFjAKegQIARAC&usg=AOvVaw1qCUsB0meHVO6vVRDIMnrR&cshid=1614129812776

You could also graft a different variety of plum onto one of the branches of your existing tree to get more pollination, if the two existing ones that you have didn't pollinate each other.
 
Carla De Leon
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Steve Thorn wrote:In general they should, and you probably won't have an issue. Sometimes certain varieties won't pollinate each other though, and if you know the names of the varieties that you have, you can check a pollination chart like this one that lists both varieties to be sure they will pollinate each other.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.burntridgenursery.com/text/Plumpollinationchart.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwjI-vzqrIHvAhVGMlkFHU_wBSkQFjAKegQIARAC&usg=AOvVaw1qCUsB0meHVO6vVRDIMnrR&cshid=1614129812776

You could also graft a different variety of plum onto one of the branches of your existing tree to get more pollination, if the two existing ones thst you have didn't pollinate each other.



Thank you!

I have been inquiring with friends to see if they know of any Asian plum trees out there (South Seattle area) so I can get some scion wood.
 
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