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Elaine ingham vs anaerobic tea

 
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Has anybody else had strong success with anaerobic tea? Ingham is very confidently insistent that anaerobic tea or compost will kill your plants, and yet I've used anaerobic tea that sat in a sealed barrel in the sun for several months and smelled like septic tank and my plants only thrived, and I know other permies like morag gamble use an anaerobic comfrey tea to success, and there are also more traditional methods like bokashi.
I honestly feel like she's somewhat of a dogmatist regarding this
 
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I use excess water that collects at the bottom of the terrarium, sometimes it's dark and smelly if I wait too long... but usually it's clear. It's not really a tea but it goes through all layers of soil and cork in the terrarium, being pulled out of a small aquarium first (by the cork). I put some of it in a "flower pot pond", which has some aquatic plants and they didn't die ;) and I use it in flower pots with various plants, they seem happy too.
 
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Jeremiah, maybe this thread will help you understand:

If you are creating ideal compost, that is well balanced then it is nearly impossible to incorporate too much.
However, if the compost is out of balance (meaning acidic or basic with little of the good biosphere) then you can indeed have too much of a bad thing.
The other mistake is to use anaerobic compost as the main component, this tends to harbor far more "bad" microbes and their complment critters than "good" microbes and their complement critters resulting in an imbalanced soil system.



https://permies.com/t/63914/Soil
 
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Jeremiah Squingelli wrote:Has anybody else had strong success with anaerobic tea? Ingham is very confidently insistent that anaerobic tea or compost will kill your plants, and yet I've used anaerobic tea that sat in a sealed barrel in the sun for several months and smelled like septic tank and my plants only thrived, and I know other permies like morag gamble use an anaerobic comfrey tea to success, and there are also more traditional methods like bokashi.
I honestly feel like she's somewhat of a dogmatist regarding this



Check out the recent videos with Dr Christine Jones on this topic.  I think Dr Ingham's opinions may be a bit dated, or incomplete.  I don't know how much actual work she's done on anaerobic teas.  Korean Natural Farming (and other systems) has been using them for ages.  Never had an issue with them myself.

The soil is a combination of aerobic and anaerobic microenvironments so both are present.  Also, nitrogen fixing bacteria (for one) don't fix nitrogen in the presence of oxygen according to Dr. Jones.

Bottom line for me is maximal diversity of soil microorganisms.  Fungus is also very important, probably more important, than bacteria.

Green Cover Seed is running webinars with her.  There are several recent ones up.
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