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What type of electro netting for rotational grazing In the woods

 
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I have been using kencove positive negative goat and poultry electric netting but apparently it is very flimsy and poorly made. It snags on every single branch and Thorn there is and it shorts out whenever any vegetation touches it. So in order to set it up I need to clear a 2-ft path through the woods I usually try to angle it around trees and just cut down small shrubberies.
What options are there for rotational grazing silvopasture? Do I need to look into permanent paddock fencing rather than portable electronic fencing? Right now I am only rotating goats and ducks but I do plan to start following them with miniature pigs shortly.
 
pollinator
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Location: Ozarks
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homeschooling goat dog building wood heat homestead
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I'm running a few meat goats. Three adults and two kids. As of yet, I just have 12 acres with high tensile 6 strand electric perimeter fence, plus one paddock, also done with high tensile. The paddock is open area so it's mostly grasses that need recovery time and that I don't want them eating down to the point where it looks like it was mowed. As far as the woods area, they're all over it throughout the day since they're browsers. I'm just going to run them that way until they kill off all the poison ivy and seedlings/saplings. Then I'm also cutting down medium sized trees for firewood and will do some shiitake logs next year. Within a few years, the woods will be a lot tamer and easier to cross fence. We technically have two properties adjacent to each other, 7 acres plus 8 acres so the first cross fence will be on the property line and that will be high tensile as well. From there, I'll start using netting I think.

Our land is hilly forest so it's already hard to fence so I and the goats will be cleaning it up for a while before I attempt to create paddocks There's nothing in the woods I want to save. 10,000 seedlings/saplings, 2,000 small to medium trees all need to go so I don't see the need for paddocks yet. Large oaks and hickory trees big enough to drop lots of acorns and hickory nuts, I'll keep. There will be a slow transformation to a semi-shaded pasture(silvopasture/savanna) because I have to be careful about losing top soil on these slopes. My first paddocks will be used to exclude the goats as I clear tree leaves and plant pasture in one small area at a time.

They're doing a pretty good job of eating anything green within 5-6 foot from the ground this year. The buck and two does came from open pasture settings so last year they seemed afraid to go too deep into the woods but with both does nursing a kid, food is important this year so like I said, they're all over the 12 acres. I'd say 2-3 years and no seedling/sapling less than 6-8 foot tall will be left. That will make it a lot easier for me to get in there and take out the small to medium trees which in turn will make it easier for me to cross fence and make paddocks.

I watched a video from Greg Judy and he doesn't plant seed. He rolls out round bales of hay to seed land. Sounds like a plan to me because it serves as mulch until the grasses take root. That is, after the goats and I have cleared the land enough to roll out bales. I might also toss some other seeds down before unrolling the hay. For instance, Hancock seeds has Brown Millet which is supposed to be good for preventing erosion. It's also one of the varieties in their deer mixes and goat mixes. It's not only hilly here but too rocky to actually plant seed 1/8 - 1/4" so I'm hoping spreading it and unrolling hay on it will have the same effect. I'll let the goats eat hay for a few days and then exclude the goats so the seed takes hold and has a chance to grow to grazing height.
 
John Pollard
pollinator
Posts: 298
Location: Ozarks
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homeschooling goat dog building wood heat homestead
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PS, I've been watching Greg Judy, Gabe Brown, Allan Savory the past few days and since I'm not getting any younger, it's given me some ideas for letting nature and the animals do as much of the work for me as possible. We have one hen. She's the smart one of the bunch as the rest got killed by hawks. She's also broody if more than 8 eggs collect so I'm going to get another dozen fertilized eggs from a neighbor, lock her in the coop and let her be the incubator this time. She'll be a better mother/teacher that way too I think. As of now, she's totally free range and I don't feed her yet she lays an egg every day. She's smart enough to hang around with either the LGD puppies or the goats most of the time which is why the hawks haven't gotten her. Super homestead hen. One egg a day is actually enough for us since I'm really the only one who eats them. I just want more chickens to utilize as tools. Tick eating machines for one.

I also plan to get some small pigs, Kunekune or a Kunekune mix. I think the goats, pigs and chickens will be a good mix. Ought to help keep parasites down.

 
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Netting in woods and brush is not fun. I use premier 1 net worth reasonable success, but I despise having to put it up in these areas... Pasture with this netting is great, but brush and thorns with nets is a horrible experience. I look forward to the day I have a perimeter fence to reduce this frustration.
 
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Don't.

It's a bad electromagnetic environment.


Herd your grazers or just goat proof your fences so they can't get out.

 
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