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Are Micro Dwarf Tomatoes a good choice for urban permaculture?

 
Posts: 93
Location: Southeast corner of Wyoming
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Just curious if my tinies would be considered a good fit.  I found out about the micro dwarf tomatoes last year and fell in love.   Mine were all under 18 inches tall with most being only 10 to 12 inches tall.  One of my 8 inch tall plants produced over 70 nice sized cherry tomatoes!   Yes I saved seed from that one.  Currently many varieties are a lacking in flavor but many folks are working on taste, size and the ability to produce good tasting tomatoes in the middle of winter under lights.  One vision of the micro dwarf is to live in your house "poaching"  the light and heat you already produce to give you fresh cherry tomatoes all winter.   (Some are actually working on lines producing almost saladette size tomatoes but mine are all cherry size)

Right now I am growing out some F3 from another breeder but I am hoping to make some crosses of my own this summer.

 
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Location: OR - Willamette Valley
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They're weird little things for sure. We grew some this year on a whim, thinking they might be nice for some of our town farmer's market customers but I don't think we even sold one. I'm looking forward to having one in my window this winter though I'm not really a houseplant person. They do seem practical, as houseplants go.
 
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I don't see why not! My biggest knock against the tiny tomato plants is that they often have tiny root balls as well.  Indoors or under intense cultivation (like the ones I had in a garden box right outside my door one year that got attention at least three times a day, including spot watering as needed) this is not a problem. But they don't last long where I am because in hot weather even one watering a day won't keep them alive -- at least, not the few species I've trialed.  But for small spaces  where they will get lots of attention, sure!
 
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I've grown standard determinate inside on a sunny windowsill, that works but obviously they really want to get to big, so I think it's an excellent idea and who knows, the gardening bug might bite!
 
Dorothy Pohorelow
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I am in Wyoming so while we can get hot during the day our nights even when we hit 90 can drop to the low 60s...  we also have wind lots and lots of wind.  I had most of my micro dwarfs in 1 or 2 gallon grow bags with a few in 6 inch pots and 3 in a single 30 inch deck planter.  I did notice they are a more sensitive to poor soil which as you mentioned seems to come from the size of their root ball and they don't have the strength to push roots though heavy clay.  Once I swapped out that stuff for good light soil that plant took off and gave a nice harvest.  I know the newest varieties I have were developed in Florida so should be able to handle heat a bit better then some of the older varieties.

Spring didn't happen here as in we dropped below 50 a couple of nights last week so I am just now getting my tomato seedlings out which has delayed my micro dwarfs as I didn't have room to start them.  And more delays as I have a trip the end of the month and will be gone a week.   Really hoping winter holds off till October so I have a chance to cross Rosy Finch (pink micro dwarf) to  Amish Yellowish Orange Oxheart and to a couple of white varieties I am growing.  
 
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I tried a few this year, they were the first things to get diseased and they just got completely ravaged. Definitely not doable in places with high disease and pest pressure like florida. Also with how small they are, the tomato worms can really do a lot of damage to them overnight, and they don't really recover well.
 
Dorothy Pohorelow
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Wry grin one way to test for cold tolerance... note that a cold front is moving through but not that the low would be in the upper 40s....  everyone looks fine this morning but we will have to see how long the tomatoes sulk before taking off again.  
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