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Keyline in rough terrain

 
Posts: 114
Location: Southern Sierra Nevada's
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Would it be ridiculous to try to rig two or three times/ rippers to this tractor to perform intricate keylines in rough terrain? Using them intermitantly where possible? Skipping around rocks and large bushes? This approach would be better than nothing I would think, yes?
Jim
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Location: Reno, NV
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Jim Lea wrote:Would it be ridiculous to try to rig two or three times/ rippers to this tractor to perform intricate keylines in rough terrain? Using them intermitantly where possible? Skipping around rocks and large bushes? This approach would be better than nothing I would think, yes?
Jim



Keyline subsoiling can be as detailed as you like or you can rough through some places and ignore microtopography going for a landscape scale treatment. Importance of accuracy will vary based on goals, time, money, terrain, soil type, climate factors, and management strategy.

there is a pattern design difference in that the yeomans plow shanks and points do not invert the soil profile due to their geometry, and many common ripping implements do bring the subsoil up to the surface in quantities.

the intermittent use you describe is not unusual as a practical technique when subsoiling in rough terrain.
 
Jim Lea
Posts: 114
Location: Southern Sierra Nevada's
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Thank you Neil for your answer. I'll look into single yeomans tines and build from there. Happy to know that my thought might be worth while.
Hoping to meet you at the Quail Mtn course with Owen. Not sure at all if I can make it happen though.
Jim
 
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