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cordwood, rubble trench, slipform

 
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Hello alll! Hope someone can answer this question. Im building a cordwood home, timber frame cordwood infill, and im considering the rubble trench method for the footing. Everything that i have read says to put a concrette grade beam on top of the trench but these are generally refering to strawbale or cob homes. Im building a stone slipform stem wall and i wonder why would i need a concrette grade beam between the rubble trench and the stem wall. could i not build the stem wall directly on top of the rubble trench. Like i said I havent been able to find any info on the specific combination of building techniques that im using.
 
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Location: Oakland, CA
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it seems to me the terminology may be wrong. there's a lot of confusion about what to call what when it comes to foundations.

instead of a grade beam, maybe it's really a footing they're thinking of. it is wider than the stem/foundation wall in order to distribute the loads better. i think you could also form this with stone, but i'm sure that's the reason. Plus it provides more contact friction with the rubble.
 
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Joe,my limited understanding is that the (reinforced)concrete grade beam is used to distribute the load( as Suki wrote)which I presume is the roof load...
but if you are having a timber frame structure you have taken care of the majority of the load...your walls are not then load-bearing so I would think that you would not need the grade beam.
There is a great forum for cordwood with many experienced minds contributing...www.daycreek.com
I'm sure they could easily answer this quandry.
Where are you building your home?
All the best
Kate
 
Kitty Leith
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Doh! Wasn't paying attention about the timber framing. in that case, Kate would be right. And calling it a grade beam would be right.

But I would still put in a grade beam. It ties the timber footings together, should be rebarred together, which helps keep the building to move as one should there be an earthquake. I don't know if you live in an earthquake zone or not.
 
joe glass
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Im building in N.W. Arkansas. Thanks for the Quick reply
 
Kitty Leith
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Thanks for the Quick reply




He he. On vacation and in the permie honeymoon phase - will slow down as soon as I go back to work!

You might want to check about the seismic zones. I think Missouri was the epicenter of the largest quake in N.American history, which would affect NE Arkansas. Don't know how that impacts NW. Arkansas.
 
Kitty Leith
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my answer has been nagging me because it was confusing, due to addressing two different subjects in one answer. hope i didn't steer you wrong.

my understanding is the rubble trench foundation is for a monolithic building to float/rock on, while the grade beam/footing foundation is all tied together monolithically for the frame to be secured to.

i don't think mixing the two systems is advisable.

in either case, you should have something continuous under your stem wall..
 
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Location: Verde Valley, AZ.
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lots of gas fracking quakes out there now, make sure the thing floats as a whole.....
 
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