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These look morel-esque, but wrong season, wrong location, growing in the Court House lawn. Can someone tell me what they are and advise me if they are suitable for a slurry? In South Dakota. Thanks in advance!
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They look like they could be verpa bohemica, a morel lookalike. We have them here but they grow in spring.
 
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I think those could be Stinkhorns. Check these photos and description at mushroomexpert.com:

https://www.mushroomexpert.com/phallus_impudicus.html

Do they smell funky? After the spore-bearing slime is removed by insects, this stinkhorn species can be mistaken for morels!

Stinkhorns make good soil out of woody mulch. And although at least one species is cultivated in China for the "eggs', I've yet to hear of anyone eating them in this country.
 
Leah Holder
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That’s definitely what they are. How amazing! Thanks for teaching me something new today.
 
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