• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • jordan barton
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Leigh Tate
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Greg Martin
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • Jay Angler
gardeners:
  • Nancy Reading
  • Mike Barkley
  • Christopher Shepherd

Sheep keepers - what infrastructure do you wish you had?

 
Posts: 85
Location: North Central Kentucky
24
dog trees chicken cooking sheep
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We have ~100 hilly acres, but the front 30-40 acres is mostly cleared, and I am wanting to run hair sheep on it, with the eventual goal of selling pastured lamb.  I will be starting with a small flock, but eventually want to increase the size substantially (in addition to also using the area for pigs, potentially a few small cattle, and chickens), and want to frontload my planning, infrastructure, and investment, instead of cobbling things together as I go.  I don't necessarily need a sheep working pen that can handle 100 ewes if I only have 10, but I'd like a setup that I can adjust and expand without needing to redo it completely as (knowing myself) I'd just "make it work" and struggle/be frustrated the whole time, or conversely with nothing to handle emergencies resulting in panic solutions.

My plans include:
A fully secure exterior high tensile wire + electric line on top fence.  This allows me to tap into the electric line running the perimeter for electric net fences as I move the sheep around the area, and also helps reduce predator pressure, in addition to giving me peace of mind that if they escape their net, they're still on the property and not in the street or anything.
A shelter that can be used as a hospital area with power run to it so I can run heat lamps if we end up with lambs needing special care, plus I could run cameras in it so I can keep an eye on things while at the house (I work from home).  Plus this could work as a winter paddock/dry lot if pastures need a rest, or we have extended cold weather requiring me to run an electric stock tank heater.
Bulk hay storage (this doesn't need to be part of the shelter area, but it probably wouldn't hurt to have it nearby)
A working area that may or may not be part of the shelter/barn area, with chutes so I can do monthly parasite evaluation/hoof trimming if needed/wellness checks as well as separate sheep out as needed.  Considering keeping this near our driveway and shop so loading sheep leaving the farm onto a trailer is less of an ordeal.


I'm new to this, and as they say, you don't know what you don't know, so I would love input from people who actually know what they're doing.
 
pollinator
Posts: 2596
Location: Bendigo , Australia
169
dog gear plumbing earthworks bee building homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
- A mobile set of panels to build a race and pens
- sheep crush
- foot bath
- shearing shed and dry pens
- ring tool to remove testicles  and tails
- trailer with suitable and safe cage for transporting sheep. Sheep must be transported in a correct manner to prevent injury, death or harm.
 
Laurel Jones
Posts: 85
Location: North Central Kentucky
24
dog trees chicken cooking sheep
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

John C Daley wrote:- A mobile set of panels to build a race and pens
- sheep crush
- foot bath
- shearing shed and dry pens
- ring tool to remove testicles  and tails
- trailer with suitable and safe cage for transporting sheep. Sheep must be transported in a correct manner to prevent injury, death or harm.



Thanks!  for clarification - it sounds like the foot bath, crush, and shearing shed could all be integrated into the "working" and chute area, is that correct?  What do you mean by dry pens?  Is this like a dry lot where they're eating hay and no grass?


what are  your recommendations for trailer type?
 
John C Daley
pollinator
Posts: 2596
Location: Bendigo , Australia
169
dog gear plumbing earthworks bee building homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If it rains just as you are shearing, the use of 'dry' covered pens means you can shear.
You cannot shear wet sheep.

Yes those other items, footbath etc can be located near each other as part of a condensed sheep handling area.
Perhaps speak with sheep breeders nearby.
In Australia the following terms are used;
- Sheep station 250,000 acre property with a million sheep perhaps
- Wool producer, a farmer that sells wool
- Sheep grazier, a farmer that fattens sheep for sale as meat.
Nobody is called a sheep farmer.
- Rouseabout, helper in the wool shed [ shearing shed ]
- Jackaroo- farm hander with stock
- Dags, clumps of dried dung stuck to the wool of a sheep, which may lead to fly-strike.
- Dagging, clipping off dags.
- mob, flock of the same type of sheep.
- Graziers Alert over the news, cold weather warning. You will hear it all over in the colder months.
For more go here.
Glossary_of_sheep_husbandry
gift
 
Companion Planting Guide by World Permaculture Association
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic