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Introducing new pigs

 
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I have 3 feeders that are about 100 pounds. I am getting 1 breeding boar that is about 20-30 pounds and a breeding gilt that is about 40-50 pounds. The feeders are fenced in the woods (moved as required) while I rotationally graze sheep separately--2 groups for another month, rams and ewes. To state the obvious, I intend to breed the boar and gilt in 4-6 months when they are of age.  

Should I throw all the pigs in together and ensure the smaller pigs get fed?
Keep the younger pigs separate perhaps with the sheep? Any concern about keeping young pigs together that you want to breed later?
My end goal is to rotationally graze the pigs like I do the sheep, but the feeders are currently being put to work clearing land.

I understand the need for quarantine periods and training to electric fence. I'm more interested in feedback regarding pig behavior, not screwing up their desire to breed, companionship, etc.

Thanks!
 
pollinator
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I've always put all mine together. My boar and sows grew up together and still made babies no problem. They never bothered smaller pigs I'd put in with them either. I imagine all you need is sufficient space.
 
Gray Charles
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Thanks... After posting it linked some similar topics where Walter stated much the same info. Any tips on feeding different weight classes of pigs? Right now I'm just meal feeding using multiple rubber pans.
 
elle sagenev
pollinator
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MMM not really. I don't feed mine. lol Well hardly ever anyway. I'd just spread the food around the floor during the winter and never seemed to have a problem. Feed more if they're skinny, less if they're fat.
 
master gardener
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I am slow to mix them. I keep new pigs in a small pen away from the others for a couple of weeks. Then I place then in a adjoining pen . Finally I mix them.
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