Win a copy of Permaculture Design Companion this week in the Permaculture Design forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

Baby goat: Floppy Kid Syndrome?

 
Posts: 45
Location: Southern Ohio (zone 6a)
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So yesterday we birthed our first goats. Two little babies, it went extremely easy. Both kids were happy and milking and walking around (with occasional stumbles). Then today, one of the kids was down and unable to stand and barely able to lift it's own head. Two hours before it was found like this it had been moving and walking around fine. I don't have a lot of experience with goats, but my diagnosis based on the internet is Floppy Kid Syndrome. Does anyone with more experience know if there is another potential diagnosis I am missing?

If it is FKS I read to treat with baking soda and with-holding milk (substituting electrolytes) for 24 hours +-. For now it is inside and being kept warm. I gave a little bit of baking soda and will continue that treatment. (along with elctrolytes)
 
master steward
Posts: 28607
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It could be a lack of selenium.
 
Posts: 57
Location: Eastern edge of the Blue Ridge Mnts. Virginia
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

paul wheaton wrote:It could be a lack of selenium.



It is very difficult to suggest what the problem may be since we don't know your geographical location.

Selenium deficiency
When livestock animals are deficient in selenium, glutathione peroxidase cannot be formed. If the animal is also deficient in vitamin E they develop nutritional muscular dystrophy due to the damage of the cell membranes of the skeletal and heart muscles. Calcium salts accumulate in the defective and dying membranes resulting in the appearance of white areas in the muscles giving this disease the name "white muscle disease." (stolen from the web)

This is more likely the case as most areas in the U.S. are selenium deficient. The fix is to go to a vet and get the prescription injection, BO-SE or equivalent. Most Vets with goat experience will opt for a selenium injection. Your Vet will also know if you are in a selenium deficient area, which helps with their diagnosis.
 
Chris Griffin
Posts: 57
Location: Eastern edge of the Blue Ridge Mnts. Virginia
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Floppy kid syndrome (metabolic acidosis without dehydration in kids) was first reported in the spring of 1987. This unique condition was first recognized in herds on the west coast and in Canada. It has more recently been recognized throughout the United States. With the increase in popularity of Boer and other meat goats, there has been an apparent increase in reports of floppy kid syndrome in Texas and other states where meat goat numbers are increasing.

The affected kid is normal at birth and develops a sudden onset of muscular weakness (flaccid paresis or paralysis) or ataxia at 3 to 10 days of age. Cases tend to occur most commonly late in kidding seasons. Affected kids are depressed, cannot use their tongues to suckle but can swallow and have marked paradoxial metabolic acidosis (anion gap HCO3, normal chloride). There are no signs of diarrhea, respiratory disease, or other signs.

The clinical signs of paresis/paralysis/ataxia in 3 to 10-day old kids and supporting blood chemistry value are diagnostic features. The causative agents have not been identified. However, infection and endotoxemia could likely be the cause. Differential diagnoses include white muscle disease, abomasal bloat, colibacillosis, septicemia, or enterotoxemia.

http://www.goatnutrition.com/CONDITIONSILLNESSES/Articles/ECMD007243.aspx

Here is the information on FKS. It is lots less likely, but not impossible.
 
Who among you feels worthy enough to be my best friend? Test 1 is to read this tiny ad:
dry stack step
https://permies.com/t/125100/dry-stack-step
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!