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Slip Straw vs. straw bale

 
Jc Carter
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Over the summer I will be building a 13 x 18 outbuilding. I have pretty much settled on a pole building with a rubble trench foundation (and using the reclaimed railroad tie/gravel stem wall method). I have pretty tight time constraints. So I am trying to figure out which infill method (straw bale or light straw clay) will be the most efficient use of my time. Anyone out there use both methods and see one as a faster infill process?

Any insight or are thoughts are much appreciated.

John
 
S Bengi
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Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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Using railroad ties in a building is not a good idea. If you must use them use only up to 1ft about the soil and then splice it with regular lumber. Only the part in the soil needs rot resistant toxic chemicals.
 
Jc Carter
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Bengi,

Agreed. The ties will only rise above ground by roughly 5 inches. Additionally, they will be flashed/drip capped on the exterior on the exterior to reduce seepage. The off gassing into the interior should be somewhat minimized by full coverage with via lumber and earthen floor/plaster.

Also wanted to give this a bump. Does anyone have a preference between the two methods. From my current perspective it seems like the light straw clay would be faster overall (though probably not for just the infill portion).

Thanks,

JC
 
Ardilla Esch
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Location: Northern New Mexico, Zone 5b
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I am in the process of building a light clay straw home and have helped with straw bale buildings. Straw bale is definitely faster to erect.

Plastering is quicker on light clay straw (after it has dried), but you do have to wait for the walls to dry. In dry-ish climates light clay straw walls dry at 1 inch per week (12 inch walls take ~6 weeks to fully dry).
 
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