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Wondering if anyone has advice on when new growth happens on an apple tree chip graft?

 
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Hello,
I was wondering if anyone could clear up some confusion for me?

I've been doing some grafting of apple trees and would like to try chip grafting,  I've been watching youtube (of course) and it seems that there are two very different thoughts about when the new growth from the graft occurs....  about half of the videos say that the graft forms a callous the first year and then grows a new "limb" the second year.  The other half seems to say that the growth starts the first year and you have a rather large limb by the end of the first season.

I'm sure that I'm misunderstanding something.

Could some tell me if I'm just totally off on the first year growth idea for chip budding?  

Does new growth ever happen in the first year of grafting?
Is the new growth happening the next spring a result of late season grafting?
Is it too early for chip budding regardless of the growth outcome?  (Today is April 5th.  Pennsylvania zone 5)
If anyone can tell me anything about new growth (or anything else about chip budding that I may have missed, I'd really appreciate it.

Thank you in advance for any advice or comments.
You all are awesome.  :)

My apologies.  I originally posted this same question in the wrong forum and reposted it here.

Tim
 
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I think a way to build your intuition here is to look at when the tree puts out a flush of new growth from all the stored carbohydrates / energy in the root system, when you bud in the fall the tree is done most of it's growth for the year so often the bud doesn't grow. Chip budding apple early in the year can produce new growth this season just like any other graft, you might use it if you're low on scion wood.
 
Tim Mackson
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Doug McGregor wrote:I think a way to build your intuition here is to look at when the tree puts out a flush of new growth from all the stored carbohydrates / energy in the root system, when you bud in the fall the tree is done most of it's growth for the year so often the bud doesn't grow. Chip budding apple early in the year can produce new growth this season just like any other graft, you might use it if you're low on scion wood.



Thank you Doug,
I really appreciate the advice and insight.  
I was hoping for an answer like this and it's very promising.

Unfortunately, I should have waited ,  I burnt up all of my scions  two weeks ago doing whip and tongue graphs....I haven't had a chance to inspect them lately, and I made a lot of mistakes like keeping my thumb on the cut of the graft to keep it moist while I fumbled with cutting the other half. That is only one of many mistakes I made and  it will be a miracle if any of those take.

I'm just starting to learn, and I wish that I would just have practiced with trees that are already around instead of purchasing scions of apples that I really want.  This would have been much more rewarding, although if I had success, it would be just duplicating trees that are already there.  This is the reason that I was asking about chip budding right now.  It would be nice to see something grow this season.

Could I still take chips from trees that are just getting ready to open right now?  I think that I understand that in the summer you look for next seasons buds that are under the existing leaves?  Probably getting too late to look for this seasons buds?

I also have "dormant" (I think) buds from a broken branch of  a Cox orange pippin tree that I ordered.  The limb is really small diameter (half the size of a pencil)  and I don't think that it's large enough for chip budding.  Probably someone who really knew what they were doing could make them work, but I think I would be better off trying to do some sort of other graft with them.

I really don't have any new varieties to start now.  I guess I'm just looking for the reward of seeing something take and grow into a promising shoot.  I bought some very discounted red delicious apple trees two years ago, and they don't really have that much growth to graft to, but I now have just about every branch that was large enough "grafted" with another variety from scions that I purchased online.   There's no reason that any should survive, but I'm almost sure that out of the bunch something will try really hard to make it.
 
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