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Mike Clifford
Posts: 1
Location: Las Vegas Nevada USA 8a/8b 4" max rain (Spring)
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There is an active permaculture group in Las Vegas. They are largely doing urban gardening with permaculture principles.
I am more interested in learning efficiencies that others have learned by experience.
Of course there are the usual resources and lots of gardeners in Las Vegas (Nevada btw) but if anyone has tried to turn an acre of the Mojave into a permaculture landscape I'd love to hear your story and how you did it.
I have a little less than an acre and a well. I'd like to come out of this experience and be able to say: 'you can grow food here at 2600 feet with 4 inches of rainfall if you do this...."
In addition to the plants and trees I'd like to know what the quickest way to do things is with maximum production.
I'm definitely a bit of a doomer and if there are disruptions in the food supply we will want to know this stuff yesterday and wish we had started last year.
I know we are not likely to compete with ....well anywhere....but I'm sure if we have a little water and a good plan we could survive.
I want to make that plan.
thanks
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1359
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
9
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Apricot, Oregon Myrtle, Almond (sweet kernel from stark bros), Jujube, Palms (dates, jelly palm), Autumn Olive, Mulberry, Pineapple Guava, Bay Tree, Fruiting Roses, Pomegranate, Beautyberry, Gooseberries, Strawberry Tree,, Eucalyptus, Grapes, Walnut, Figs, Olives. Anything in the mint family, lemon grass.
 
Morgan Morrigan
Posts: 1400
Location: Verde Valley, AZ.
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The whole key is water retention. Get the rainwater harvesting books, especially vol 2.

Read up on swales here, and do some homework on "lithic mulches" or rock mulching. Also would be nice to get some lichen growing on em for fertilizing the stuff below.

The real key seems to be burying wood where the swales can trap the moisture to let it settle down to it. This will allow the roots to get down deep enough to survive the baking sun.

Plan for orchards and tall brush. Once they start dropping leaf litter, you will have something to work with for more veggies.

get a laser line generator, and head out back, and see which directions your land drops.

Native Seed Search is the place to start for veggies, you already see a pretty good list for the trees above.
http://70.47.99.86/contactus.asp



You will never be able to get max production, unless you get some shade and windblocks in.

Start in the lowest and furthest south corner, with mid height stuff,like apricots, and make your mistakes there.
As you move north, you will need to start planning shade, sun angles (mark out the max sun angles at solstices), and cart paths.
Plan everything on how the water will flow, and build your paths, and garden bed layouts to fit that ideal. Think lazy too, you want it to be easy to get to stuff.

Don't plan on leaving any raised beds for long term, but you can put in some wicking beds to get some instant gratification.
Raised beds use extra water, and can't pick up any rain either. Wood in contact with the ground brings roaches almost every time. Avoid railroad ties.

This is supposed to be fun !

If you want max impact and output, you really need to hire a pro. Will take time, even with good help from these here folks, to set this up.

take a look

 
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