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Quick methane production technique?

 
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I was just randomly searching for more info about methane production and came across something I've never heard of before.


"The fastest way of making methane is pyrolysis of Cow Dung.
I know it's very odd but this is the low cost and fastest and also the easiest way to prepare methane.

To do it take some amount of cow dung in a dry flask or some container and suck all the air out of it by a suction pump or a vacuum cleaner but be carefull not to suck out the dung itself.
Now put a cork on the flask and heat it.

After sometime keep it to cool and you will get methane in the vacant space of the Flask.

Answer by Somsurya 7 years ago Report Abuse"


So, what is the official name of this production method? How fast is it? Can it be done at the home user level? Is this even true?
Anyone?
 
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Location: Verde Valley, AZ.
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a take on the standard methane digester.

"sucking the air out" is not quite correct, the oxy has to be removed to allow the anerobic bacteria to grow and produce the methane.

this can be optimized by exposing to light and dark cycles too.

best way is a new CO2 tech, that they are looking at that uses the ocean as the collector, rather than trying to do gas permeable membranes
 
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Bill, When we used pyrolysis to convert woodchips to syngas we had to try and keep as much O2 out of the system as possible to reduce the explosiveness of the sytem. I wonder if that is what they are getting at?
The guys who invented the system we were using used all sorts of things including animal manures. They said anything with carbon could be heated without burning , to produce gas.
 
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it would be temperature dependent. Higher temps = more CO and H2 being generated. Lower temps = more methane, I expect.

This is different than anaerobic digestion, and pyrolysis is a well known process. I don't know that it is more efficient than the bio-route, though. It does require an external form of heat to get the process going.
 
Bill Bianchi
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So this is like wood gasification, only with dung? And rather than producer gas, you get methane?

Thanks for the replies. I had no clue about what they were talking about. It sounds like a manure gasifier. That's why I asked in here. I figured someone in this crowd would know more than me about it, and I was right.

Thanks again.
 
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