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"Meeting the Expectations of the Land" essays in sustainable agriculture and stewardship

 
Judith Browning
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This collection of essays is edited by Wes Jackson (the Land Institute), Wendell Berry (activist, writer, poet) and Bruce Colman. It was published in 1984. As far as I can tell there is no mention of the word "permaculture" but the ideas are there. For me, it is always encouraging to know there are so many thinking and actively working and living "as if nature mattered" a quote lifted from the book "Deep Ecology" by George Sessions and Bill Devall.
I lean towards philosophy rather than "how to" when it comes to owning books...I always think that if I could just get a grip on the very heart of things everything else would fall into place. But then I also tend to just run across books rather than seek them out so I am not sure how effective this is.
 
Michael Forest
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I'm currently reading (among other books) Ecoforestry: The Art and Science of Sustainable Forest Use. It came out in 1997. Hardly anything has been published on the subject in the last 10 years. I don't consider myself a tree farmer, just trying to be more respectful of Nature's Way. The book is a collection of essays and articles based upon the premise (and cliche) that Nature knows best when it comes to "forest management". I'm definitely an outsider locally, since trees are dieing of disease before I can harvest them, I'm not replanting the "open spaces", and I am definitely loosing money because I choose to not "harvest" on an economic scale. "The heart of the matter" is everything to me. The book's introduction talks about two forms of sustainability: economic and ecocentric. The first is an anthropomorphic view while the second leans towards deep ecology, animism. Philosophical precepts are in short supply in our culture, unfortunately. We tend to be guided by economic/efficiency logic instead. Wendell Berry talks about the value of the natural history of things, rather than changing a "place" we should figure out what "belongs" in a place. Modernity is always about advancement. The book Ecoforestry is about how to learn from the natural world, to be guided by it rather than being concerned with improving it.......
 
Kota Dubois
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Michael, I don't know if you follow the Archdruid's blog, but this week he has started to talk about the modern religion of Progress. For me it's the philosophy of the thing that's important too. For the rest I'm pretty sanguine and laissez faire.
 
Cohan Fulford
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Interesting ideas! I know you were talking about books, initially, but any links to websites for any of these topics? Books are great too, if I can find them around for reasonable prices...lol
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Hi, Cohan...The book in the title I found on the free table at our library and 'Deep Ecology' was at our thrift store for a quarter...but I didn't know about them before I ran across them. I do know that there are web sites with extensive Wendell Berry essays and poetry available and that the Land Insitute has a web site for more on Wes Jackson and others. Follow the threads of their ideas where they take you...there are some inspiring philosopher farmers out there. Gary Snyder has been around a long time...his poetry speaks to many permaculture principles...I have found his books for a couple dollars at used book stores. I know folks find good prices for used books on line but I guess I really love the search through book shelves to see what might appeal to me.

I'm sorry I can't post a link (or follow one) on my kindle but all of these should show up with a search.
 
Cohan Fulford
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Thanks, Judith, I'll have to do a little looking around..
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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It looks like this book is still available at amazon us


Publisher: North Point Press (August 1986)

and more information about the book at the Land Stewardship Center
 
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