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guerilla seed balling  RSS feed

 
Jen Shrock
pollinator
Posts: 363
Location: NW Pennsylvania Zone 5B bordering on Zone 6
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I have thought about guerilla seed balling along the local highways. There are some spots that are just plain barren and ugly (and somewhat protected from getting mowed down) that could use a boost of beauty. I might be coming into a decent amount of mixed flower seeds that I thought of putting together and going on a one person beautification campaign. Part of the areas, though are on a pretty steep slope.

Any suggestion on how to make seed balls that wouldn't all just roll to the bottom of the hill, but instead "catch" on the way down? I have heard of some squishing the mixture through reasonable sized opening fencing. Would it make square "logs" that could then be cut into chunks and dried? I also thought about maybe, instead of balls, roll them in round logs (sort of like cookie logs) and "slice" them before they dry to make disks. Any other ideas?
 
Gail Saito
Posts: 88
Location: Medford, OR
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How about rolling the balls and then flattening them a bit. Then they should not roll down the hillside!
 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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I like the idea of the seed disks. You could sling them up on the slope like mini-frisbees.

 
Chris Kott
Posts: 823
Location: Toronto, Ontario
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I like the approach that suggests the best hiding spot is in plain sight. Namely, what about choosing your planting sites beforehand, and figuring out a way to prep the site so that it looks like a municipal project? I can see this working better with seedlings of any size, where you could run up with a potted seedling, rip up a circle of sod, drop it in, plant it, water it, and perhaps mulch heavily with something that looks close enough to beauty bark, something like ramial wood chips or chipped bark. While I don't like interfering more than necessary, I'd add to this a trunk cage (to be removed soonest) and maybe a flag or any type of support structure common on authorized municipal plantings. The most effective guerillas are those that look like they're supposed to be there. I even like the idea of cheaper commemorative plaques mounted on small rocks or something (especially if you can arrange rocks decoratively for the purpose of the plaque and have them also regulate temperature and sieve moisture from the air) that resemble those purchased for donors of trees or park benches or the like. You could do up a fake commemoration, or you could be completely blunt about the unauthorized nature of the tree.

Having said that, you could take all these steps and use seed balls, but that would increase your time in the spot over just chucking a seed disc.

-CK
 
Neil Evansan
Posts: 69
Location: Valley of the Sun
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Chris Kott wrote:I like the approach that suggests the best hiding spot is in plain sight. Namely, what about choosing your planting sites beforehand, and figuring out a way to prep the site so that it looks like a municipal project? I can see this working better with seedlings of any size, where you could run up with a potted seedling, rip up a circle of sod, drop it in, plant it, water it, and perhaps mulch heavily with something that looks close enough to beauty bark, something like ramial wood chips or chipped bark. While I don't like interfering more than necessary, I'd add to this a trunk cage (to be removed soonest) and maybe a flag or any type of support structure common on authorized municipal plantings. The most effective guerillas are those that look like they're supposed to be there. I even like the idea of cheaper commemorative plaques mounted on small rocks or something (especially if you can arrange rocks decoratively for the purpose of the plaque and have them also regulate temperature and sieve moisture from the air) that resemble those purchased for donors of trees or park benches or the like. You could do up a fake commemoration, or you could be completely blunt about the unauthorized nature of the tree.

Having said that, you could take all these steps and use seed balls, but that would increase your time in the spot over just chucking a seed disc.

-CK
We've all seen the many "Memorial Crosses" on Highways and Roads. Many times, those are allowed to stay for months and even years. When you see one, add a Seed Ball.

When my Brother died in 1988, we gave out Seedlings at his funeral, and 25 years later, I know there are many hundreds of tall majestic Spruce Trees in many locations in the Willamette Valley and Portland. Because my Dad bought several couple bags of seedlings, we had waaay many seedlings left after the services. My Wife and I took a bag (I think it was 100) and spent several weekends planting trees around Portland, usually in groups of 3, to symbolize 3 Brothers, and because not all seedlings will make it past the early years. In one field we asked to plant a ring of 25 trees. 15 years later, that field was turned into a sub-division, and still had 18 growing thriving trees that were incorporated into the design.

Adrien Lapointe mentioned an apple tree Guild Seed Ball. I'd think that and other anchor trees would make wonderful remembrances at funerals or Weddings or other significant receptions / events.
 
Gail Saito
Posts: 88
Location: Medford, OR
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I can't think of a more beautiful way to honor someone's life than to plant a tree, flowers, scatter some seed balls. Wonderful that you planted all those seedlings ...a great way to remember your brother!
 
Chris Allen
Lab Ant
Posts: 46
Location: Wheaton Labratories
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I;m a disk golfer myself and a three or four inch seed disk could be flung a lot further then just a ball. Great idea can't wait to use it.
 
Jay Jenkins
Posts: 1
Location: In the timbers of Fennario
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I've often wondered the same thing - this would be the easiest method for guerrilla growing I think! Very possible too. The challenge is then going back to harvest of course!
 
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