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Can someone please tell me what kind of tree this is. No one I've asked at any plant store knows!!

 
Terry Fusco
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What is this tree called? I have no info but this pic. Please this hopeless romantic would love to know what this tree is. Thank you so much
image.jpg
[Thumbnail for image.jpg]
Please tell me so I can't go about finding more about them.
 
Renate Howard
pollinator
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Location: zone 6b
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Dogwood. Very common, I'm really surprised they didn't know! They are wonderful understory trees!
 
Terry Fusco
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They said dogwood but something about how pronounced the flowers are and that there are only 4 pedals
 
Ken Peavey
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Dogwood. No question about it.
 
Terry Fusco
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Is it easy to get. I'm in Las Vegas?
 
duane hennon
gardener
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Location: western pennsylvania zone 5/a
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http://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/pg_cofl2.pdf

this is the flowering dogwood (there are many types)
an eastern understory tree
likes moist soil and shade
growing in Vegas may take some effort
 
Terry Fusco
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You say there are many types...what type would you guess this picture is specifically? Thank you all. You are helping a lonely heart!
 
Haley Bradley
Posts: 2
Location: Red Rock, TX - between Lockhart and Bastrop
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There are so many cultivars of dogwood, it would be quite difficult to find the exact one from that particular picture. If you google flowering dogwood, you will find a wide variety of available types. Cloud 9 is what my grandmother has in her yard in Mississippi and it looks like that picture, but it's really hard to tell since it mostly just shows one branch and only one season of the tree (their leaves mostly go a beautiful red during the fall). Dogwoods are widely available at tree nurseries, at least in the southeast where they grow everywhere. As others have said, they like it wet so Vegas might prove a challenging environment, but I know there are several shrub/bush types that can be grown in containers (I've even seen semi-bonsai versions). I'm hoping to have some on our land here in Texas soon, which is pretty dry as well (though not Vegas dry). They usually bloom around easter and are quite beautiful throughout the year. Good luck!
 
Cortland Satsuma
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Location: (Zone 7-8/Elv. 350) Powhatan, VA (Sloped Forests & Meadow)
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Hi Terry,

I am in central VA. We have 4 different ones in our yard and several native ones in our forest. The wild ones are taller and straighter, the cultivars are shorter and rounded. They could be easily pruned to a dwarf size and as they are very slow growing, that makes planning for its habitat fairly easy. I think you should be able to provide adequate moisture for it. Cuttings can be rooted from the one you have in the picture. My S-I-L lives in Henderson, and, I have been amazed at what does grow there with a little planning and effort! If you are going to pay a premium to buy a dogwood, besides checking out the pictures on google for the different cultivars looks, you may want to consider buying the one that produces an edible fruit. Ps. My favorite for looks is our Cherokee.
 
John Elliott
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Forget it Terry,

If the harsh sun of Vegas doesn't kill your dogwood, the dry soil will. Maybe if you planted it on the north side of a building, and maybe if there was a leaky faucet right next to it, maybe it wouldn't die, but I'm afraid this an example of wrong plant, wrong place. Just because the temperature of the Deep South is comparable to Las Vegas don't think that you can make up for the rest of the climate differences.

How about a nice mulberry tree instead? When I lived in Vegas, I had a mulberry that wouldn't die. It was old enough to have a tap root that made it down to the water table, and it was going to keep coming back, no matter how much it was hacked at. Dogwoods have shallow roots, and even in the few places in the Vegas Valley where the water table makes it to the surface, I have a feeling the low, low humidity would still burn it up.
 
Bob Dobbs
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I'd try cornus kousa before anything else. You would still get the beautiful flowers, you would also get a delicious fruit, you get more heat hardiness and sun tolerance, and you get a yield for having to grow a tree in the desert. Could one of these grow away from town with no care? I seriously doubt it. But if you had a little rain barrel for the tree you could swing it.
 
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