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Rotating crops/harvesting planning?  RSS feed

 
Kelso Kira
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So I'm about to build my "portable" raised garden bed. My question is now im planning out the spacing between plants and I'm getting the impression some plants like zuccinni and cucumber need more space than I have.
The dimensions are roughly 12" in hight from the base of the bed, 36" wide and 5 feet in length.

The main plants I intend on growing are

bell peppers
kale
carrors
quinoa
beets
broccoli
cucumber
zuccini

I'm assuming the cucumber and zucchini might need their own containers. I would like to be more reliable on growing my own food so as far as having a continuous amount of of these throughout the year would it be best to plant these each a week apart so I have a constant supply. I'm also uninformed on how long these plants last. I read briefly that most vegetables will produce food once then you have to replant the entire plant.

any information would be great
 
John Polk
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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You didn't indicate where you will be growing these (climate), and that can make a huge difference.

Some things come to mind.

Cucumbers and zukes would be better off in their own containers. If not staked/trellised, they can take up a lot of space.

Most pepper plants have a very small root system compared to the top portion - very good in containers.
My best luck with peppers has been to NOT water them until the leaves begin to curl, then wait till sundown.
Frequent/shallow watering will kill them.

Beets & carrots are root crops. If they have to share root space with others, they will not do well.

I have no experience with quinoa. My kids won't eat it.
(Most of my family is from S. America where quinoa is grown as animal fodder.)

Don't mix a garden of plants that require frequent watering and those that don't - some will do well, the others will perish.
Planting every week (or 2) is good, if your growing season is long enough.
Good luck.

 
Kelso Kira
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I live in southern california I forgot to mention that.
 
Miles Flansburg
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Kelso, My zukes grow to about 3 ft across and a couple of feet tall, once they start bearing fruit they continue until frost kills them. So we pick fruit continually from these and only plant a couple of plants. Cucumbers are much the same. We planted a lemon cuke last year that we couldn't keep up with, there was so much fruit. I let my beets and carrots mature so I only plant and harvest them once. My peppers grow slowly so I only get about 1 month of them. Hope that helps?
 
solomon martin
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unless you want to eat them all the time or terrorize your neighbors with free zucchini 3 or 4 plants is all you will need to have an ample supply for a big family, dont waste space growing them, once they start fruiting they will give you an abundance. Cucumbers like to grow more or less by themselves and dont like to be top watered, i grow cukes for pickles so I like to plant them all at the same time to get my canning done all at once. carrots and beets can stay in the ground if you dont have time to deal with them, so I plant them all at once as well. same with onions and potatoes. i do like to plant my greens about every 1-2 weeks to have a steady supply of young tenders. same with sweet peas and green beans, although if you are diligent about harvesting the legumes will keep producing, especially in your climate. most other crops are long season, here in Mt we only get one harvest, but you might do well growing spring peas, carrots, radish and green onion in the spring, harvesting and then moving to 3 sisters (corn beans winter squash) in mid summer for fall harvest. Brassicas (broccolli, cabbage kale etc.) are heavy nitro feeders, so dont follow those in your corn or potato beds. Typically, follow a legume crop with a root or corn crop and "fallow" with carrots and greens and radish. I like to sprinkle all my beds with alliums as they tend to ward pests and cohabitate with most crops. Peppers and tomatoes, eggplant and basil all love eachother, and I usually plant those together, and follow next season with legumes to amend the soil. If you plan on tilling and cultivating every season, make sure to rotate your crops, potatoes and turnips for example will develop scab and root worm if planted in the same patch again and again. strawberries like shallots and garlic. Plant sweet peas everywhere. let them grow as weeds and pull them out as necessary to plant other crops. Clover is a good cover crop, so dont pull it out when weeding, unless it gets to aggressive for your seedlings, a good "chop and drop" weed. Radish and bok-choy are good to plant on marginal soil or over-looked corners of your garden that you cant find the time to get to. they grow fast and will loosen the soil when you harvest to prepare for seedlings or direct seedlings. Learn to love dandelion, mullein and comfrey, they are medicinal and do a great job adding nutrients and minerals to your top soil. ( a weed is a plant whose value is overlooked)

hope this helps...

 
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