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Posts: 8
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this is growing along my fence line pretty prolifically i thought it may be a mint from the way it is spreading and the leaves??.... maybe
Any ideas?
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pollinator
Posts: 755
Location: zone 6b
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Looks like henbit. When I was a kid we'd eat the tiny bit of nectar at the end of each flower.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1450
Location: northern California
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I would say dead-nettle (Lamium purpureum), a close relative of henbit.
 
gardener
Posts: 818
Location: western pennsylvania zone 5/a
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looks like dead nettle, or as some call it, lunch


http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/04/30/urban-forager-dead-nettle-where-is-thy-sting/

 
sean mahoney
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thnx it does appear to be dead nettle. i have quite a bit coming in any suggestions on usage?
 
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Looks like ground ivy; aka, gill-over-the-ground. The leaves, dried of fresh, make a fine herbal tea.
 
Posts: 3
Location: Missouri
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I cast my vote for Dead Nettle. You can eat it, but in my opinion it tastes like dirt. I'm sorry. I mean, it has an "earthy" flavor to it. A member of the mint family. It's all over my yard, but I don't do anything with it. I just like to watch them shoot up in the springtime. shallow roots don't really compete with anything.
 
Seriously Rick? Seriously? You might as well just read this tiny ad:
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https://permies.com/t/92034/permaculture-projects/days-natural-building-wofati-cob
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