• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Desert Hugelkultur Questions- SW CA  RSS feed

 
Posts: 12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Guys,

I live in Agua Dulce, a few miles from Vasquez Rock National Park, located between LA and the Antelope Valley. It's a hot (hottest summer I remember was 113) and dry (average rainfall about 12 inches) climate with chaparral vegetation dominated by junipers, yucca, and schrub oaks, and annually mustard and foxtail's.

There is a horse trail running up a hill on the side of my property which collects a lot of rainwater and sediment, bringing it onto my property each year. To help, I built 4 15-60 foot swales (about 2 foot deep x 3 foot wide) on contour along the hill side. With the two feet of dirt I dug out of the swale, I made a mound in front of the ditch and used it covered up a small amount of random pine and other wood I had layed there (I think I added in some pepper tree I learned later is bad for hugelkultur, anyone know just how bad??) Currently I am in the midst of converting them into 6-7 foot tall hugelkultur beds to try and absorb all this water and hold it in for plantings.

I began converting one of these swales into a bed already and have filled it with some of my extra firewood and then alot of dry branches, twigs, juniper and shrubs a neighbor cleared. This woody pile is about 3 feet tall by 3 feet wide. I then added a 8" layer or so of loose alfalfa hay with goat manure that accumulates in barn, hoping to add some nitrogen, and to act in place of the traditional layer of upside down sod which is only available commercially out here. However, I recently discovered access to lots of large stumps (some are 100's of pounds), firewood sized pieces , branches, twigs, you name it, that a friend wants cleared. Is it too late to put the large stumps on this pile? I'm wondering if they will take to long to rot in my dry climate. With the other swales I was planning to partially bury the stumps in the swales and use smaller pieces branches above, but I am unsure how much wood, of what size, is ideal. In my desert hugelkultur, how much wood should I use relative to how much branches twigs, "sod" and soil I use ideally?? My soil to cover the wood pile also is also pretty poor and sandy and becomes a layer of clay after a few feet. Should I mix it with compost or something? Get new soil? Also are there any special considerations when doing hugelkultur is an desert climate? Do I want a wider based bed so to avoid drying out I think would be a problem in a narrow bed, etc? The wood I'm using very dry and the farmers almanac predicts .6 inches of rain in the next two months so should I water the bed as I build it up to get water holding benefits planting this season?

Also I have free access to several truck loads of composted dairy cow /sheep manure, and have practically unlimited availability of composted horse manure, alfalfa mulch, and straw and some goat manure.

My general plan for the untouched swales goes add 3 feet of stumps, then 2 feet of braches/twigs/leaves, then a foot of 3/4 composted dairy cow/goat manure mixed 1/4 alfalfa mulch. Then I was going to add a foot of native topsoil. Blend this into the compost beneath a little, cover with alfalfa mulch and plant. I have a good amount of extra tomato, squash, watermelon, lima bean, sunflower, and corn seedlings I can plant their too, I dont really expect them to survive with summer coming up with no water at al but I would love to be wrong. I also, could bring up a hose or soaker hose to the area. I was thinking a soaker hose under mulch behind the first swale would trickle down and help it all during the intense summer drought and heat. I also really want to plant alfalfa, millet, several fruit and legume trees, and a lot of the pioneer plants from the "Greening the Desert" series, which geoff lawton’s used on the site (I posted the list immediately before this post if interested), to really get the system where I think the veggies will thrive. I already have the pig's face plant on the property which I just have to take cuttings from! Also, I have apple red I feel would be a very similar plant.

Any suggestions/comments/improvements? What would you guys do with these material? I'll try to add some pictures soon.

Been doing research on this website for a long time now and it feels great to be finally building my first hugelkultur!
Thanks so much,
Sam
 
Posts: 1400
Location: Verde Valley, AZ.
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
that will work ! , would be tempted to put in a french drain rock hole to get heavy water down to the bottom too..

I would def bury a single line of drip, just for heart of summer, and also early winter. most trees are serioulsly stressed in winter, when folks aren't paying attention to their water needs.
Just take the tiniest drill bit you have, and pop in a hole every 18", no drippers to plug.

Sounds like lasagna swales !

Think you will be surprised how well things will do next year, after it compacts down some. those roots will dive for it.
 
Sam Rosenthal
Posts: 12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Awesome! I've never really used rocks and have a ton I've been waiting to look for uses for. Sounds interesting! What do you mean by "heavy" water?

Do you think I should have a drip line for each berm or that if I have one at highest berm it will permeate enough? Great tip about the early winter watering, I hadn't heard about that.
 
master steward
Posts: 4154
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
198
bee books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sounds like you are doing some great stuff there Sam. Let us know how it turns out. Pictures would be great! I think Morgan was talking about a way to channel any heavy flows of water you may get during big rains or the like? Using rocks to help decrease erosion?

Do you know if the manures you are getting are organic? The feed stock organic?
 
Morgan Morrigan
Posts: 1400
Location: Verde Valley, AZ.
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
yup, was suggesting to try and capture the flooding rains.

look up "french drains". Line part of the trench, around the drip tube , with gravel, And then bring the gravel all the way to the surface in a couple places, to trap water deep below.
 
Sam Rosenthal
Posts: 12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oh, and the manures aren't from animals not feed organic hay, but just hay. Also I do the smaller veterinary tasks for the owner of the steer manure so I know they haven't been medicated, etc.
 
Morgan Morrigan
Posts: 1400
Location: Verde Valley, AZ.
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
if you have "live" soil, the fungi/bacteria will decompose most of the toxics. Add good compost at the very minimum, or solarize it to knock all the bad bacteria down so can be recolonized.

 
Sam Rosenthal
Posts: 12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Perfect! It's been laid out and solarized by chance and I'm also adding great compost and some seaweeds.
 
Posts: 1977
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
70
bee books chicken forest garden fungi trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would water it while building to get it started
 
Matu Collins
Posts: 1977
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
70
bee books chicken forest garden fungi trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would water it while building to get it started
 
If tomatoes are a fruit, then ketchup must be a jam. Taste this tiny ad:
The Earth Sheltered Solar Greenhouse Book by Mike Oehler - digital download
https://permies.com/wiki/23444/digital-market/digital-market/Earth-Sheltered-Solar-Greenhouse-Book
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!