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phoenix oysters on large logs?  RSS feed

 
Posts: 96
Location: West Virginia/ Dominican Republic
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Will phoenix oysters produce on logs larger than 18 inches?
I have a very large double trunked white pine that is a danger to my house. I have arranged to have it cut down next week. The tree guy gave me a decent price as long as all he had to do was put it on the ground and cut the trunk into firewood lengths.
The stump will be left about four feet so I can put the phoenix plugs in it also.
My goal is to use phoenix oysters to break down the tree over the next few years and if I can get some meals out of it in the meantime then so much the better.
 
pollinator
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The hyphae will grow into the log, but recognize that a large diameter log is a bigger food source for the fungi,so it will take longer to run out of food. Mushrooms are produced at the end stage of the lifecycle of the mycelium. When it starts running out of food, it gets a signal to send out fruiting bodies. That is why you see a stump or a dead snag covered all over with mushrooms, all at the same time.

One reason that plug spawn works as well as it does is that it is a high concentration of mycelium and when you drill a log and put in the plug spawn, it takes off and quickly infects the entire log. Since the whole log is quickly inoculated, you get a nice flush of mushrooms when spawn is close to done eating. If your goal is to get regular production out of it, I would suggest randomizing the size of your pieces. The smaller pieces should flush with mushrooms first, then bigger ones, and finally the whole stump.
 
John Sizemore
Posts: 96
Location: West Virginia/ Dominican Republic
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I am going to go from the stump to the end. I am not so much worried about big production as some production. I am looking as a way to speed up decomposition while getting something to eat out of it.
 
Posts: 1
Location: San Juan Islands, WA
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Hello! First post here, thanks for having me!

Large diameter logs will take longer to fully colonize, but will produce for quite a bit longer than your typical 4"-6" logs. I would guess 7-8 years as opposed to 4-5.

They will also require more plugs than smaller logs, never skimp on the spawn, or in this case, plugs.

Hope that helps!

-NBM
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/email
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