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what fungi can be grown in pine?  RSS feed

 
Meryt Helmer
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Location: west marin, bay area california. sandy loam, well drained, acidic soil and lots of shade
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The only mushroom I have come across that I might be able to cultivate in pine wood is The Phoenix Fir Oyster, Pleurotus pulmonarius but I am uncertain if it will grow in bishop pine which is mostly what I have. does anyone here know if I can grow these or any fungi in bishop pine wood? I can get other types of logs but I have some pine trees I will need to cut down in the next few years for the safety of my home and it would be fun to grow mushrooms in them if that is at all possible.
 
Erica Wisner
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We have had fun but not much results from trying to cultivate specific mushrooms. We do enjoy picking a few easily-identified wild ones though.

Have you tried sending your question to the highly knowledgeable folks at fungiperfecti.com?


-Erica W
 
Meryt Helmer
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I have not sent an email off yet but that is a great idea! I will probably do so before buying any spawn.
 
Landon Sunrich
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I think (but am not 100 % sure) That I've seen chicken of the woods (the kind we have out west) growing on fallen pines
 
Christopher G Williams
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In theory Laetiporus Conifericola(Chicken of the woods) will grow on pine logs, and several companies sell plugs for it. However I have read a few different reports from people who actually tried to grow them that they didn't do so well.

Pines are tough, most are fairly limited in what types of fungi they will allow to grow on them...
 
John Saltveit
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The biggest fungal benefit to pines is not the fungi eating the dead wood. The best is symbiotic mushrooms creating mycorrhizal fungi that help the tree to grow. They would be seen on the ground near the pine tree.
John S
PDX OR
 
Meryt Helmer
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Location: west marin, bay area california. sandy loam, well drained, acidic soil and lots of shade
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which fungi like to grow symbiotically with pine?

we have many edible wild mushrooms growing on the ground here but we also have many other trees so I don't know which ones are growing with the pines. in front of the house we have a lot of candy and there are pines but also oaks and bay trees and many other trees that I don't yet know the names.

recently on a with a friend we found a large white mushroom growing out of a dead pine that looked and smelled like a white oyster mushroom. we left it there since we where not certain. I did email fungi perfecti and they did not know if any oyster mushrooms can be grown on pine but thought it was worth my doing an experiment if I am curious enough. the main reason I would want to grow mushrooms on the pines are because I have to have them pruned anyway so will have a lot of big logs to find uses for.

we have one very neat looking fungi here that I keep meaning to post a photo and ask about. it might be some sort of brain fungi but it looked more like seaweed to me. very wavy and strange looking. my husband and I have both watched spores come out of these and we have noticed that where this fungi is growing in the garden the plants often seem to be happier and healthier. whatever it is it must send spores everyplace and be very easy to grow since I have found it growing on vermiculite inside my house. i was rooting some African violet cuttings and there int he vermiculite was some of this fungi.
 
David Vidal
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Location: Catalonia (Europe), Zone 9
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In Europe we've got a type of mushroom called Bloody Milk Cap (Lactarius Sanguifluus) which lives in symbiosis with pines, and is specially appreciated in Southern Europe.

 
Meryt Helmer
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Location: west marin, bay area california. sandy loam, well drained, acidic soil and lots of shade
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we have many Chanterelle mushrooms growing all around here. I wonder if their tree's int his area are the bishop pines? hmmm

I also wonder what I can do with the bishop pine wood that we end up with when pruning and when trees fall down in storms. I guess finding other uses that are not fungi related would be a new thread. thanks for all the help in this thread
 
Paul Ryan
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example: in the New Forest national park in southern england (an ancient woodland), the sitka spruce areas are a great place to find wild Winter Chanterelle mushrooms in large quantities (Craterellus tubaeformis, yellowfoot). They live in a mycorrhizal symbiosis with the sitka spruce trees.

If you search for "mycorrhizal" + the name of the species you're calling 'pine' (use precise latin name) you will find out which fungi will grow in symbiosis with the trees you have. It's tricky, though and can take a long time before they produce mushrooms (if they ever do).

Try it and see!
 
Meryt Helmer
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Location: west marin, bay area california. sandy loam, well drained, acidic soil and lots of shade
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thank you!
 
drake schutt
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I believe Philoita nameko will grow on pine.
 
John Saltveit
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I think it can grow on cherry, other hardwoods, and fir and spruce, but pine is too full of pitch and anti-fungal compounds for it to grow well.
John S
PDX OR
 
Meryt Helmer
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I think I will buy my plugs and use them on oak but I may do a small experiment on a little bit of pine since I have so much of it but also because recently on a hike we saw what looked and smelled just like an oyster mushroom growing out of some fallen pine. we had no camera and where too far from home but it has left me more curious and the fungi perfecti people did suggest I do an experiment. so I will do that when I grow my mushrooms in oak this year. the rest of the pine wood that we end up with will be used for other stuff. if I had goats I would make a goat playground. most of the fallen trees are already used for a human playground
 
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