• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • jordan barton
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Greg Martin
  • Steve Thorn
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Leigh Tate
  • Mike Haasl
master gardeners:
  • John F Dean
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Stacie Kim
  • Jay Angler

Worm Bin Design Plans

 
pollinator
Posts: 378
Location: wanderer
161
forest garden fungi foraging bike homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Raising worms to increase soil fertility is easy & fun when you have well-performing worm bin.

Backyard gardeners, farmers, homesteaders & even small patio growers can all be successful raising worms as a simple & effective way to turn kitchen scraps & yard trimmings into water-soluble nutrients available to their plants. Build your own worm bin using these Worm Bin Design Plans in order to make excellent, nutrient-rich organic fertilizer & soil conditioner without having to flip compost piles or buy fertilizers at the store.

How-to Build a Worm Bin Design Plans is a detailed text document with instructions & photographs on how to build your own well-performing worm bin to house your worms, create & use fertile worm compost (castings) as well as worm liquids (leachate) to help boost the life in your soil. Soil nutrients = healthier plants & better yields.



Perhaps you’ve tried worm farming (vermiculture) before with mixed success, or you are entirely brand new to it. Either way, these How-to Build a Worm Bin Plans are designed to help your worms & your soil thrive. I’ve designed the worm bin to optimally raise worms & create professional-grade, fluffy worm castings. In these Worm Bin Plans you will find instructions that set you up for success in building a worm bin, creating a healthy, thriving worm environment, & using the worm castings to make soil nutrients available to your plants.



This download comes with:
  • Detailed instructions for building an optimally-designed worm bin that will set you up for success
  • A list of all the affordable supplies & basic tools necessary to build the worm bin
  • Photos for every single step of the build process
  • Instructions for where & how to install your worm bin for best results
  • Operational instructions on how to start up your worm bin as well as how to feed & care for your worms
  • How to harvest & use the worm castings once they are ready
  • Specific details on raising worms during the cold months as well as during the hot months
  • Hard-to-find information on raising worms successfully in the tropics
  • Troubleshooting common issues that may arise
  • A resources list with links to get more high-quality information on how to raise healthy worms
  • My contact information for free trouble shooting support: I want you to be blissfully successful.
  • ...and more!

A Worm Bin That Is Easy to Build
This Worm Bin was specifically designed so that it can built using typical home improvement tools, such as drills & utility knives, & using basic materials that can be purchased at any hardware store. The illustrated instructions for these How-to Build a Worm Bin Plans are designed to be easy to follow so that nearly anyone with access to a hardware store & a few basic tools can build their worm bin in less than a day.



These illustrated How-to Build a Worm Bin Design Plans include photographs at every single stage of the build process along with a detailed text description of the how & why of each step & feature, making them very easy to understand & follow along.

Optimized Features of this Worm Bin Design include:
Horizontal worm flow for much easier operation
The worms move horizontally from one partition to the next as they do in most commercial operations. No lifting of heavy vertical partitions to get to the castings out of this bin.

Fully-aerated worm environment
Aeration is built into the worm bin design above and below the worm chamber for a fully-oxygenated (aerobic) environment. The results are healthy worms that produce healthy worm castings. This bin produces professional, fluffy worm castings with good soil structure (tilth). You won’t find stinky sludge at the bottom of this bin design.

Integrated insect screening keeps the critters out of the worm bin
While you may find a few insects living in the worm bin ecosystem, the insect screening installed on this bin design keeps the bugs from over-running the ecosystem & taking valuable food away from the worms.

Resilient in hot as well as colder climates
Having built worm bins & prototyped for years in hot & tropical environments, these Worm Bin Design Plans include valuable information on how to keep the worms healthy & thriving when weather gets hot in the summertime. I also include advice on what to do to keep worms thriving in the colder months for temperate environments.

Operational instructions & free trouble shooting support.
If you are having a some challenges, get a hold me with the contact information provided in the document & I will help you troubleshoot. Feel free to ask any questions about their operation using the email address provided in the How-to Build a Worm Bin Design Plans document.

Why I designed this Worm Bin
While I love turning my food scraps & yard trimmings into soil fertility for my garden, I do not love turning compost piles. So in my own backyard, I’ve been experimenting with passive composting systems like worm bins for many years.
After using the commercially available, mass-produced “worm farms” I got tired of their many flaws: having to lift heavy partitions, having the air squeezed out of the castings by upper partitions causing the worm bins to go airless (anaerobic), then having to toss out stinky, muddy “worm sludge” - instead of getting to use fluffy, healthy worm castings, inadequate protection from curious insects, worm leachate not properly draining & going anaerobic as a result, not enough air flow issues, etc. But I still wanted the convenience & awesomeness of turning my food scraps & yard trimmings into beautiful worm castings for my garden soil. With this as my motivation, I designed my own worm bin. After a bit of trial-&-error & more than a few prototypes, my current worm bin design fixes all these flaws I was struggling with using commercially mass-produced “worm farm” products. I now consistently get professional-grade, healthy worm castings all year round.

These worm bins have been tested in numerous settings for years: I have built dozens of worm bins for friends, family, & clients who are all now also successfully raising worms & turning their food scraps into healthy soil for their gardens & farms. My dream is that these How-to Build a Worm Bin Plans will help many more folks become successful at raising worms, feel successful at on-site composting, & lower their food waste streams while growing healthy local food, medicines, & ornamental plants for themselves & their communities.

Experience of Seller
11 years of organic gardening & farming experience | 6 years of raising worms | completed 5 Permaculture Design Courses | a Compost, Compost Tea, Compost Extract, Life in the Soil, Soil Microscopy Course | and 2 Mycology Courses

Feel free to message me for worm compost consulting & more info on how I can help you boost your soil fertility & grow in abundance.

Thanks. :-)

One Final Tip: After your purchase, print the high resolution pages 18 “YES! FOODS” & 19 “NO! FOODS” of this document front & back on the same sheet & keep it next to your kitchen compost pail to help you remember what to feed & not feed your worms to keep them healthy & happy.

Low resolution sample:


How-to Build a Worm Bin Design Plans

$10.00

Worm Bin Design Plans
Buy access to this content
Seller Mike Kenzie
 
Mike Kenzie
pollinator
Posts: 378
Location: wanderer
161
forest garden fungi foraging bike homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Wikipedia wrote:Eisenia fetida (older spelling: foetida), known under various common names such as manure worm, redworm, brandling worm, panfish worm, trout worm, tiger worm, red wiggler worm, etc., is a species of earthworm adapted to decaying organic material. These worms thrive in rotting vegetation, compost, and manure. They are epigean, rarely found in soil. In this trait, they resemble Lumbricus rubellus.

Red wigglers are reddish-brown in color, have small rings around their body and have a yellowish tail. They have groups of bristles (called setae) on each segment that move in and out to grip nearby surfaces as the worms stretch and contract their muscles to push themselves forward or backward.

Eisenia fetida worms are used for vermicomposting of both domestic and industrial organic waste. They are native to Europe, but have been introduced (both intentionally and unintentionally) to every other continent except Antarctica. Tiger worms are also being tested for use in a flushless toilet, currently being trialled in India, Uganda and Myanmar.

Eisenia fetida also possess a unique natural defense system in their coelomic fluid: cells called coelomocytes secrete a protein called lysenin, which is a pore-forming toxin (PFT), which is able to permeabilize and lyse invading cells. It is best at targeting foreign cells whose membranes contain significant amounts of sphingomyelin. (Lysenin is also toxic to organisms lacking sphingomyelin in their cell walls, including B. megaterium, though the pathway is not understood).


SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eisenia_fetida
WORM-Eisenia_foetida_by_Rob_Hille_WikiMedia.org_CC_BY-SA_3.0.JPG
Eisenia foetida by Rob Hille, CC BY-SA 3.0, WikiMedia.org
Eisenia foetida by Rob Hille, CC BY-SA 3.0, WikiMedia.org
 
Mike Kenzie
pollinator
Posts: 378
Location: wanderer
161
forest garden fungi foraging bike homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Wikipedia wrote:Perionyx excavatus is a commercially produced earthworm. Popular names for this species include composting worms, blues, or Indian blues. This species is marketed for its ability to create fine worm castings quickly. It has recently become more popular in North America for composting purposes.

This species belongs to the genus Perionyx. It may have its origins in the Himalayan mountains. This species is suited for vermicomposting in tropical and subtropical regions.


SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perionyx_excavatus
 
pollinator
Posts: 2555
Location: 4b
707
dog forest garden trees bee building
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Mike,  May I ask what your bin is made of?  Is it wood or made from a plastic bin or ?  Could you post a picture of a completed bin?  I'm just trying to get an idea of the size, if it's scalable, if it would fit in the area I have available, that type of thing.

Thanks for any info you can share.
 
Mike Kenzie
pollinator
Posts: 378
Location: wanderer
161
forest garden fungi foraging bike homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Trace,
Thanks for your questions.

Trace wrote:May I ask what your bin is made of? Is it wood or made from a plastic bin or?


I use the plastic heavy duty storage totes from the hardware store to make my worm bins.

I would love to make one out of wood, however I do not have enough experience with wood working nor the necessary tools. Though a wood worker could easily use all of the main design principles in these Worm Bin Design Plans that I have made (proper aeration, proper drainage, horizontal flow partitions) to create a wooden worm bin. I would recommend using a highly rot resistant species of wood for a worm bin as this is a composting process which has the potential to compost the compostable materials of the composter in question. Especially since there are typically saprophytic fungi present in a worm bin ecosystem. Even with rot resistant wood, the wooden worm bin would not last near as long as a plastic one. However, maybe that's a good thing for multiple reasons.

Trace wrote:I'm just trying to get an idea of the size, if it's scalable, if it would fit in the area I have available, that type of thing.


As for size, I have built worm bins with the heavy duty storage totes in the following sizes for the following applications and yes I have built scaled-up systems for clients as well:

   • 5 gallon: KIDS educational size worm bin

   • 12 gallon: ONE-person household size bin.
       ◦ Exterior dimensions (at top of bin) 21.88 in. L x 16.3 in. W x 12.5 in. H
       ◦ Interior dimensions (at bottom of bin) 15.75 in. L x 11.25 in. W x 11 in. H

   • 17 gallon TWO-person household size bin.
       ◦ Exterior dimensions (at top of tote) 26.88 in. L x 18 in. W x 12.5 in. H
   • Interior dimensions (at bottom of tote) 22.25 in. L x 13.5 in. W x 11 in. H

   • 27 gallon THREE-person household size bin.
       ◦ Exterior dimensions (at top of tote) 28.55 in. L x 19.61 in. W x 15.27 in. H
   • Interior dimensions (at bottom of tote) 23.5 in. L x 14.5 in. W x 13 in. H

   • 40 gallon FOUR-person household size bin.
       ◦ Depth (Inches) 38.19 x Width (Inches) 21.88 x Height (Inches) 16.94

   • 55 gallon LARGE FAMILY size bin.
       ◦ Exterior dimensions (at top of tote) 45.43 in. L x 21.13 in. W x 19.52 in. H
       ◦ Interior dimensions (at bottom of tote) 39 in. L x 14.75 in. W x 17.25 in. H

   • 70 gallon FAMILY FARM size bin.
       ◦ Exterior dimensions (at top of tote): 45 in. L x 23.92 in. W x 22.28 in. H
   • Interior dimensions (at bottom of tote): 34.91 in. L x 18.1 in. W x 16.72 in. H

Thanks. :-)
gift
 
Willie Smits: Village Based Permaculture Approaches in Indonesia (video)
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permies Affiliates Program
Click here to learn how to be an affiliate for "Worm Bin Design Plans", and start earning 40% of the sales it makes!