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Can I grow any good mushrooms on a fresh cut pine?

 
pollinator
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Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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I'm about to cut a 15-20' black pine because it's directly on top of my electric cable. I've already cut most the limbs off. Can I grow any edible mushrooms on the stump or the trunk or maybe in the pine straw after it falls off the limbs? I guess it's the wrong time of year? I'm 90 miles south of KC, MO.
 
gardener
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Right time of the year. Wrong species of tree for saprophytic mushrooms that eat dead tissue. Many mushrooms grow on pine, but they are mycorrhizal, growing in symbiosis with the tree. Pine has resins that fight fungal attacks, and therefore it's tough to grow them on purpose. Also tough: redwood, black locust, cedar, giant sequoia. True fir, hemlock and spruce are much better as far as conifers go. Why not just use it for wood chips so that fungi can eat it as a secondary decomposer? It can improve the organic material in your paths or soil in general. Give some time for it to decompose for growing areas.
Sorry,
John S
PDX OR
 
Ken W Wilson
pollinator
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Thanks! I thought that was probably the case but there's not much pine here so maybe my only chance to grow on it. Also this was the middle tree in a cluster. Seems like a great spot to try plugging some logs. Almost full shade. Guess I'll cut some hardwood.

Last year some kind of mushrooms were growing between the trees. I think slippery jack but didn't ID them closely enough to try them. Too dry this year. Maybe next year I'll get a big flush like morels after an elm dies.
 
pollinator
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I inoculated a Ponderosa Pine with Chicken of the Woods from fungi.com this spring, depending on your weather you might still have time before it freezes to inoculate yours. It's too soon to tell about fruiting with mine, but I can see the mycelium development on the cut end.
 
John Suavecito
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Good point. I would think that you could get some amount of mushroom, but my guess is that it probably wouldn't be worth your time, effort, and expense on spawn. If you had true fir, hemlock, spruce, or probably even Doug fir, I would think it would probably be worth it, but really only you can decide. The anti-fungal elements can work to your advantage if you want them to last for a long time as a path material, or even as a fence post, etc.
John S
PDX OR
 
pollinator
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Pleurotus ostreatus (true oyster mushroom) and P. pulmonarius (Indian oyster) will grow on conifers. Grifola frondosa (hen of the woods/maitake) prefers broadleaves, although you may get a crop with good inoculation on pine.
 
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