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Images of Fungi: share for teaching & education  RSS feed

 
Loxley Clovis
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Since creating & teaching many permaculture Impress (LibreOffice's answer to Powerpoint) classes I've collected quite the archive of images related to permaculture. I feel it would behoove our online community to share our images for learning & teaching purposes. All images shared with adherence to & respect for attribution: always telling others the source where you got the image.
We can even use the concept of permaculture zones:
Zone 1: share images that you have taken & created of your projects,
Zone 2: share images that you have taken & created of others' projects,
Zone 3: share images from the Creative Commons, Public Domain, & other other copyleft licenses (eg. the WikiMedia Commons),
Zone 4: share images from permaculture websites, this way they can be attributed & it will hopefully draw more attention to their projects,
Zone 5: share relevant images from any other sources. Fair Use Doctrine may apply in the U.S. (and possibly other countries?) for nonprofit educational use.
Without further ado, I'd like to present what images I've collected so far from my "Fungi in Permaculture" class. Note, I've not used all of these images in class, I just saved a lot during my research.
Please feel free to upload your fungi images to this thread!
Morchella_esculenta_Wikimedia.org.jpg
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Morchella esculenta, from Wikimedia.org
Morel_Wikimedia.org.jpg
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Morel, from Wikimedia.org
Mushroom_Insulation_Installation_Ecovative_Design_by_Mycobond_WikiMedia.org.jpg
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Mushroom Insulation Installation Ecovative Design by Mycobond, from WikiMedia.org
 
Nick Kitchener
Posts: 477
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
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I saw this the other day...


A fungi that grows in salty sand!
Psathyrella ammophila
 
John Saltveit
gardener
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Good idea and interesting images.
John S
PDX OR
 
Loxley Clovis
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Wow Nick!!! Thanks for sharing! I've been to many beaches, but I have never seen mushrooms growing on beach sand!!! I guess I'm always paying too much attention to the ocean's horizon & not at my feet. I know what I'm doing next time I'm going to the beach!
Do you know if this variety is edible, medicinal, or poisonous?
 
Loxley Clovis
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IMAGE 1: Mushroom cap morphology by debivort from WikiMedia.org
IMAGE 2: Coprinus comatus, shaggy ink cap, lawyer's wig, shaggy mane, from WikiMedia.org
"When young it is an excellent edible mushroom provided that it is eaten soon after being collected (it keeps very badly because of the autodigestion of its gills and cap). If long-term storage is desired, microwaving, sauteing or simmering until limp will allow the mushrooms to be stored in a refrigerator for several days or frozen. Also, placing the mushrooms in a glass of ice water will delay the decomposition for a day or two so that one has time to incorporate them into a meal. Processing or icing must be done whether for eating or storage within four to six hours of harvest to prevent undesirable changes to the mushroom. The species is cultivated in China as food.
The mushroom can sometimes be confused with the magpie fungus which is poisonous. In America, the 'vomiter' mushroom Chlorophyllum molybdites is responsible for most cases of mushroom poisoning due to its similarity with shaggy mane and other edible mushrooms." -Wikipedia.org
IMAGE 3: Shaggy Ink Caps busting through asphalt by Mr Barndoor from WikiMedia.org
CAPS_Mushroom_cap_morphology_by_debivort_WikiMedia.org.png
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Mushroom cap morphology by debivort from WikiMedia.org
EDIBLE_Coprinus_comatus-_shaggy_ink_cap-_lawyer-s_wig-_shaggy_mane_(Pl._7)_BHL2978947_WikiMedia.org.jpg
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Coprinus comatus, shaggy ink cap, lawyer's wig, shaggy mane, from WikiMedia.org
EDIBLE_Shaggy_Ink_Caps_busting_through_asphalt_by_Mr_Barndoor_WikiMedia.org.jpg
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Shaggy Ink Caps busting through asphalt by Mr Barndoor from WikiMedia.org
 
Loxley Clovis
Posts: 109
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Boletus chrysenteron (Red Cracking Bolete) by The High Fin Whale from WikiMedia.org
Boletus chrysenteron by Jörg Hempel from WikiMedia.org
Xerocomellus chrysenteron by George Chernilevsky from WikiMedia.org
EDIBLE_Boletus_chrysenteron_(Red_Cracking_Bolete)_by_The_High_Fin_Whale_WikiMedia.org.JPG
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Boletus chrysenteron (Red Cracking Bolete) by The High Fin Whale from WikiMedia.org
EDIBLE_Boletus_chrysenteron__by_J-rg_Hempel_WikiMedia.org.jpg
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Boletus chrysenteron by Jörg Hempel from WikiMedia.org
EDIBLE_Xerocomellus_chrysenteron_by_George_Chernilevsky_WikiMedia.org.jpg
[Thumbnail for EDIBLE_Xerocomellus_chrysenteron_by_George_Chernilevsky_WikiMedia.org.jpg]
Xerocomellus chrysenteron by George Chernilevsky from WikiMedia.org
 
Loxley Clovis
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Xerocomus chrysenteron by Jerzy Opioła from WikiMedia.org
Inonotus obliquus, chaga, Karmėlava forest, Lithuania by Tocekas from WikiMedia.org
reishi by frankenstoen WikiMedia.org
EDIBLE_Xerocomus_chrysenteron_Jerzy_Opio-a_WikiMedia.org.jpg
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Xerocomus chrysenteron by Jerzy Opioła from WikiMedia.org
MEDICINAL_Inonotus_obliquus-_chaga-_Karm-lava_forest-_Lithuania_by_Tocekas_WikiMedia.org.jpg
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Inonotus obliquus, chaga, Karmėlava forest, Lithuania by Tocekas from WikiMedia.org
MEDICINAL_reishi_by_frankenstoen_WikiMedia.org.jpg
[Thumbnail for MEDICINAL_reishi_by_frankenstoen_WikiMedia.org.jpg]
reishi by frankenstoen WikiMedia.org
 
Bill Erickson
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Lots of beautiful pics of fungi here, Loxley. Deserves some apples I'm thinking.
 
Miles Flansburg
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Yep more apples!
I would love to hear more about your Fungi in Permaculture class too Loxley.
 
Loxley Clovis
Posts: 109
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Miles Flansburg wrote:Yep more apples!
I would love to hear more about your Fungi in Permaculture class too Loxley.

Thank you for your interest Miles. My partner Rhapsody & I are currently co-teaching permaculture classes at the Wellsprings in Ashland, OR throughout the summer. So far they've been introduction to permaculture classes & workshops. For last week's workshop we built an herb spiral after class. Next month, July, we will be teaching Social Permaculture classes Thursday nights at 6 PM.
As for our "Fungi in Permaculture" class, we are currently writing the material for it, so it is not yet finished. The images that I post here are images that I have come across online while making the slides for the class.
My goals for the "Fungi in Permaculture" class are as follows: reduce people's mycophobia by showing them how awesome & beneficial fungi are, teaching folks how important fungi are to the soil foodweb & forest ecosystem, showing people how they can use fungi as companion "plants" & bioremediation friends. Because we also have commercial kitchens on site, we will also be doing cooking classes.
I was inspired to write the "Fungi in Permaculture" class after reading Paul Stamet's book Mycelium Running. He mentions permaculture as a solutionary approach to gardening & bioremediation several times in that book. So he's without a doubt an ally of the permaculture community. sepp holzer's Permaculture book also has some indispensable natural small-scale cultivation techniques. 
We do have Stropharia rugosoannulata (wine cap) mushroom beds at the Wellsprings that we've made that fruit seasonally in our large garden-farm. The food from this garden supplies the cafe-restaurant here at the Wellsprings. We are planning to incorporate many more edible & medicinal varieties of fungi in our garden-farm as well.
 
Miles Flansburg
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That sounds great ! Keep us posted.
 
Loxley Clovis
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Trametes versicolor, Turkey tail by T.Voekler, from WikiMedia.org
Trametes versicolor, Turkey tail mushroom, plus alder catkins by Peter Stevens, from WikiMedia.org
Mycorrhizal symbiosis fungus by Natr WikiMedai.org
MEDICINAL_Trametes_versicolor-_Turkey_tail_by_T.Voekler_WikiMedia.org.png
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Trametes versicolor, Turkey tail by T.Voekler, from WikiMedia.org
MEDICINAL_Trametes_Versicolor-_Turkey_tail_mushroom-_plus_alder_catkins_by_Peter_Stevens_WikiMedia.org.jpg
[Thumbnail for MEDICINAL_Trametes_Versicolor-_Turkey_tail_mushroom-_plus_alder_catkins_by_Peter_Stevens_WikiMedia.org.jpg]
Trametes versicolor, Turkey tail mushroom, plus alder catkins by Peter Stevens, from WikiMedia.org
Mycorrhizal_symbiosis_fungus_by_Natr_WikiMedai.org.svg.png
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Mycorrhizal symbiosis fungus by Natr WikiMedai.org
 
Mamaro Folesi
Posts: 4
Location: New Zealand Samoa
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Hello, thanks for sharing!

I'm really inetrested in growing muchrooms on my farm in Tiavi, Apia, Western Samoa. It's a rainforest enviroment. Any ideas of what may grow? I'm looking at different vegetables and herbs for residential use but also commercial growing for the local restaurants. I was researching mushrooms a while ago but thought it would be so differcult. It's 20-33* most of the time and some monsoon rain. I'm looking at greenhouses and using shipping containers but it's all trial and error. We have rich soil with volcanic rocks. We also have a beach area those mushrooms in the sand are amazing but I can't seethem growing in Samoa. I was wondering about truffles?
Regards,
Roanne
 
Loxley Clovis
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Mamaro,
Hopefully someone here with experience growing fungi in the tropics, particularly Polynesia, will respond. In the mean time my quick search pulled up these articles:

"It turns out that growing mushrooms in Samoa is not as easy as you might think. The hot tropical climate is hard on mushrooms, and few conventional substrates are available locally. Farmers lack elaborate laboratory facilities with cooled growth chambers, and grain and hardwoods generally used for mushroom cultivation are not grown in Samoa. Daisuke has overcome these obstacles with his creative ideas. Rather than cultivating the common oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus, he uses P. pulmonarius, an oyster mushroom more tolerant of higher temperatures. Other species he has had success with are Auricularia polytricha (wood ear mushroom), Ganoderma lucidum (reishi), and Pleurotus citrinopileatus (golden oyster mushroom). The Auricularia and Ganoderma strains he is using were found in the native forests of Samoa, and other cultures have been sent from Japan. Daisuke has also experimented with Lentinula edodes (shiitake), however, he has found that the climate and available substrates limit its production."
Daisuke Goto – The first to cultivate mushrooms in Samoa, by Mana Ohkura, PhD student in Plant Pathology at Cornell University, March 1, 2017

"The tropical mushroom varieties that METI has experience with belong to the species Pleurotus. They are referred to as Oyster mushrooms. The varieties used are: P. sapidus, P. himalaya and P. butancream. One of the conclusions of the research project was that several tree species considered invasives in Samoa, such as the African Rubber tree (Funtumia elastica) (pulu vao), the African Tulip tree (Spathodea campanulata) (fapasi) and the Albizia tree (Albizia chinensis) (tamaligi), as well as a species of flowering vine in the morning glory family, Merremia peltata, can be used as components of the substrate for growing tropical mushrooms."
Tropical Mushroom Growing

I wish you luck & success on your fungi journey
EDIBLE_Pleurotus_pulmonarius_(Jacq.)_(Indian_Oyster-_Italian_Oyster-_Phoenix_Mushroom-_Lung_Oyster)_P._Kumm_by_Richard_Kneal_Wikimedia.org.jpg
[Thumbnail for EDIBLE_Pleurotus_pulmonarius_(Jacq.)_(Indian_Oyster-_Italian_Oyster-_Phoenix_Mushroom-_Lung_Oyster)_P._Kumm_by_Richard_Kneal_Wikimedia.org.jpg]
Pleurotus pulmonarius (aka: Indian Oyster, Italian Oyster, Phoenix Mushroom, Lung Oyster) by Richard Kneal, from Wikimedia.org
EDIBLE_Auricularia_polytricha_by_Pieria_WikiMedia.org.jpg
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Auricularia polytricha by Pieria WikiMedia.org
MEDICINAL_reishi_by_Eric_Steinert-_WikiMedia.org.jpg
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reishi (aka: lingzhi) by Eric Steinert, WikiMedia.org
 
Mamaro Folesi
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Location: New Zealand Samoa
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Thanks so much!! this is very useful and rejogged my memory as I had previously read this article on Daisuke Goto. I hope they're still successfully growing in Apia. All the best, Mama Ro
 
Loxley Clovis
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You're welcome Mamaro. I hope you can use the trees mentioned in the second article (metisamoa) as substrate. If successful it would be a cool way to help clear invasive tree species.

"Everything that you can do with [industrial] materials (PVC, steel, etc.) you can do with earth & plants. For instance, I think the keyline system is a better system for irrigation than piped systems. ... So what we try and [create are] systems which don't need an awful lot of [industrial] material. There's a very good book by Ken Kurn called The Healthy House: An Owner-Builders Guide to Biological Building and it goes into discussion of the materials used in homes very thoroughly. I think it's almost compulsory reading." -Bill Mollison, 1983 permaculture design course

Industrial fungi: Ecovative Design is doing some cool stuff


 
Antonio Scotti
Posts: 40
Location: Spain
forest garden fungi urban
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Thanks for opening this thread and sharing you images and knowledge
 
Loxley Clovis
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Thank you for the knowledge appreciation Antonio. However, I can't take credit for the images. They're all taken by other people & are uploaded in the Creative Commons; so I suppose they are "our" images.
I'd like to thank everyone who makes this sharing possible by contributing to the Creative Commons!
 
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