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observation: white rot fungi variation

 
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So today I'm just wandering around the property looking at things, paying attention, taking pictures, that sort of thing. I try to take at least one day a week to do so.

I noticed this about two different stains of mushrooms I have incubating. Both are white rot fungi on the same batch of chipped alder.
The oysters have totally colonized their medium and the alder chips are all still white. The other primary decomposer got started later but seems to be taking off quite well - However it (or something else) has left greyish, bluish, black spots all over the chipped alder. Here are two pictures for comparison.
DSCN1068.JPG
[Thumbnail for DSCN1068.JPG]
Oyster Spawn
DSCN1069.JPG
[Thumbnail for DSCN1069.JPG]
A Different white rot fungus
 
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Sure would be interesting to see what that dark stuff is under the microscope. Spores? Hyphae?
 
Landon Sunrich
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The fruit bodies bruise a similar color. I was wondering if it could be related to an enzyme. And perhaps the result of it oxidizing? It would be very interesting to see under a microscope.

Edit: I am presuming that it is the white rot fungus that is staining the wood. Further, I am assuming the chips are not being colonized by an unintended competitor.
 
John Elliott
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Landon Sunrich wrote:The fruit bodies bruise a similar color. I was wondering if it could be related to an enzyme. And perhaps the result of it oxidizing? It would be very interesting to see under a microscope.

Edit: I am presuming that it is the white rot fungus that is staining the wood. Further, I am assuming the chips are not being colonized by an unintended competitor.



Yes, part of doing good science is being aware of those assumptions and checking them from time to time, just to make absolutely sure of what you are doing.
 
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The blue-green is more than likely a type of trichoderma.
 
Landon Sunrich
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David Hartley wrote:The blue-green is more than likely a type of trichoderma.



I suppose that's possible. But I will say this does not look like a mold to me. It looks like stained wood. Further it appears as if each of the blue(almost black) discolorations have white rot fungal treads at they're centers and the discoloration is post pronounced where the substrate has dried out.

This medium was steam sterilized prior to use.
 
David Hartley
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The mycelium of trichoderma is generally snow-white. Its spores are various shades of green. Though it does not tend to be rhysomorphic, in my limited experience.

Thier is a common fungus here that is purple. Not sure what type it is.
 
Landon Sunrich
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Is/is not rhysomorphic. Got it. I'll poke around a little and mostly give it a good long rest without me poking at it and and see what I can see
 
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