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Mystery Wyoming fruiting shrub: id?

 
steward
Posts: 4618
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
441
hugelkultur forest garden fungi books bee greening the desert
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What could it be? I am thinking chokecherry? This is along a dried up beaver pond, under some aspen trees, surrounded by raspberries and roses.
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pollinator
Posts: 167
Location: NE Ohio (Zone 6a, on the cusp of 6b) 38.7" annual precip
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Hi Miles-

Do the berries have silvery flakes or speckles on them?

Thanks!
Mariamne
 
Miles Flansburg
steward
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Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
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hugelkultur forest garden fungi books bee greening the desert
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Hi Mariamne, I didn't notice any silvery flakes or speckles. The bark does though. I will have to take a closer look next month when I get up on the mountain.
 
steward
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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Are there any shrubby cherry species? The leaves aren't quite right, but the bark and fruit looks 'cherryish'.
 
gardener
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Location: Cascades of Oregon
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Single pit? Do the leaves have a serrated edge? The chokecherry variety I am familar with from around Casper and Douglas were more purple.
 
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It is chokecherry (Prunus virginiana). Fruit should ripen black although some populations ripen red. They are usually too astringent to eat fresh but make excellent jelly or syrup, essentially unset jelly for pancakes. Occasionally they hang on the trees for a couple of months without drying out or eaten by birds and after a month of frost they get quite sweet. Probably the most common wild shrub in my area, northern great plains.
 
Miles Flansburg
steward
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Thanks for all of the replies. I will see if they have ripened to a different color when I get up there at the end of September. If they are chokecherries I will take the fruit and plant them in other areas to get a few more growing!
 
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