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Wood Shingle Types for Potable Rainwater Catchment  RSS feed

 
Ben Tyler
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I'm in the process of designing a potable rainwater catchment system for a new build, and I'm trying to figure out what types of wood shingles are okay to use. Here's what I've heard so far:

(this is all word-of-mouth or found in internet searching, so I'm not sure how reliable this is!)
- the wood shingles should of course be untreated,
- but cedar is not okay because it leaches toxic oils for the first 3 years,
- and redwood, oak and chestnut aren't okay either because they leach tannin into the water

I'm hoping someone knows of some wood types that are good for potable rainwater catchment/storage?

- Ben
 
Su Ba
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Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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I don't know the answer, Ben, but I do know that redwood is used here in Hawaii for catchment tanks. Has been used for decades with no problems that I've heard of.
 
Dale Hodgins
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Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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All of the woods that are suitably rot resistant are bound to have a little or a lot of those oils and tannins. Perhaps the water could be filtered or treated in some other way after gathering. I would prefer to drink rainwater from a plant covered green roof built with a fish safe EPDM liner.

I live where cedar is abundant but it's not something I would shingle with. It gets covered in moss and is prone to other problems in the wet environment where it grows. Cedar as a roofing material is actually better suited to places that have a hot summer and cold winter, since decay organisms on a roof in those conditions, are active for a very short amount of time each year. I saw some shakes in the Yukon that were a century old.
 
Aleksandar Jankovic
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Location: Somewhere in Serbia
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I'm really interested in knowing more about this, in particular about water catchment off Oak shingles.
 
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