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Natural Humidifying

 
Posts: 274
Location: Central Maine - Zone 4b/5a
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Does anyone (especially those of you in older homes in cold climates) humidify their homes with houseplants? I've been thinking about how to keep the humidity in my 220 year old farmhouse more comfortable through the dry months. I also have a piano in the same room as my primary woodstove, so I was hoping to be able to add humidity near it by having lush houseplants on top of the piano itself. Does anyone have any knowledge on which plants are best at transpiration? And what kind of mass of plant matter I'd need to actually affect the humidity of an indoor space? Is this feasible at all?

I already use large metal teapots on top of both my stoves to add moisture that way, and I dry my clothes inside during the winter.

Also, which plants are good for humidifying, and also for moving outside during the warm months? I'm assuming I'd want to limit extra humidity during the summer...

edited for clarity
 
pollinator
Posts: 3126
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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I find that just having a soil with moisture in my house helps humidify the house alot, so the plant doesn't make too much of a difference.
I would go with a plant in the fig family, they do well with low light, are really good at extracting the water from the soil.
 
Posts: 9002
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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Leafy greens like chard, mustard and lettuce go through lots of water. Some potted trees are water hogs. This site is about plants that purify the air. Some are very thirsty.

http://www.houseofplants.co.uk/healthytop10.htm

Water hyacinth can transpire many times more water than would be given up by a bare pool. If you have a sunny window, this would be a great spot for a tub of them.
 
S Bengi
pollinator
Posts: 3126
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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Turns out rubber plant in the fig family is the winner.
http://www.studymode.com/course-notes/Transpiration-Lab-1182129.html
 
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Posts: 946
Location: 6200' westen slope of colorado, zone 6
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S Bengi wrote:Turns out rubber plant in the fig family is the winner.
http://www.studymode.com/course-notes/Transpiration-Lab-1182129.html



Interesting- My rubber plant is our happiest houseplant.
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