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can I add 'secondary burn tubes' to my indoor wood stove?  RSS feed

 
Isaiah Robbins
Posts: 5
Location: southern Indiana
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Howdy folks,
I have a Vogelzang Mountaineer wood stove, non catalytic steel box lined with firebrick, steel baffle above fire and air intake above glass viewing door. I have a 6inch pipe and chimney straight off top outlet and straight up and out peak of roof, so the draft is great.
As most of us do, I would like to get the most heat and complete clean burn possible. Other than burning good wood and not choking down a slow smoldering fire, what can be done to maximize my heat output and minimize smoke/creosote/yucky stuff ??
I wondered if I could supply a shot of preheated fresh air at the bottom of that baffle/top of the flames area and get a secondary burn effect? I could easily enough drill holes and run some pipes along the hot firebox edge and let them dump or breathe air at that location-but would the air even flow out (drawn out of pipe from the draft) or would it be any benefit?
Hope some of you smarter fire folks are kind enough to share some thoughts...... thanks a lot everyone and happy holiday times to ya!
 
                    
Posts: 238
Location: AR ~ozark mountain range~zone7a
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Hey Isaiah, if you haven't already, you might try looking at this other thread for some various ideas/experiments eventually proven successful with David's wood boiler set-up, seeking...wood stove efficiency, thru secondary burn. http://www.permies.com/t/23295/wood-burning-stoves/Secondary-burn-igniting

Obviously your woodheater is completely different than David's custom woodboiler. Perhaps your willing to do some experimenting, that may or may not prove successful, or are ya just looking for ideas of proven designs? -Is your stove free standing or bricked into a wall?- I could suggest researching 'catalytic converter', which seems popular with the EPA these days for new woodstoves that economically increases flu temperatures without blowers.

I'm pretty sure adding any electric powered forced air is bound to lean out your emissions albeit there is expense & noise involved with blowers, not sure blast air in the upper part of the stove is the best place for that, it seems directing a hand held hair dryer at the hot coal bed seems to yield much better results for me, than directing the hair dryer at the flame baffle area, but hey maybe you saw improvement in your flame intensity with a quick test like that?

I've been only dreaming toward a 'two phase' type set-up that can be used conventionally, but convertible to a blower set-up when electricity is available...because a terrible winter storm might leave a dedicated electric blower system stranded for heat. But I never got around to actually building a working model modification.

james beam
 
Isaiah Robbins
Posts: 5
Location: southern Indiana
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The stove is freestanding, centrally located in my completely open pole barn style house. Yes, im willing to experiment and was just kinda fishin to see if anyone else may have tried such a thing. I have seen several other models of similar steel woodstoves that have these tubes incorporated into their design-and they appear to just draw air in without fan or motor, and pipe it out thru small holes above the fire as I described.
I understand and agree hoe blowing air into a hot coal bed works, but im trying to ignite the unburned gases and smoke that has risen off the fire, before it travels along top of baffle and out the flue. Thanks, and I am gonna read thru the thread you mentioned again.
 
Dc Taylor
Posts: 15
Location: Livermore, CA
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Preheating combustion air is a great idea for first and second generation stoves' combustion efficiency. Just be aware that any modification to your "approved" stove could be cause for non-payment of an insurance claim. Several of my customers had their fire insurance canceled until they fixed the problem...usually with a new stove.
 
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