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Accumulator plants for specific mineral deficiencies (not just nitrogen)

 
D. Logan
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Location: Soutwest Ohio
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I am trying to work out a list of plants for various deficiencies that might occur. These plants could be gardened or just allowed to grow wild on the property, but then be harvested for compost or chop-and-dropped to increase the content of the soil for other plants. Most people are aware, if not familiar with, the nitrogen fixers. I am interested in finding out what tends to be good at mining other things such as the list below.

Molybdenum
Potassium
Sulfur
Copper
Magnesium
Zink
Phosphorus
Manganese
Iron
Boron
Calcium

There are others, but they seem to minor to worry about until these more noteworthy ones are covered. Obviously having these plants draw it up into a more readily absorbed form only works if it is there to begin with, but it seems like a good start if someone is trying to avoid outside inputs and/or going fully organic.
 
Johnny Niamert
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Location: Colo
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This site is a database which you can search by plant type, chemical type, or element type.

It is very useful to get a baseline for what plants may/could contain. I like to think some variability exists, due to soil, environment, etc..
The site is kind of 'user-unfriendly' but you should be able to navigate it with some practice.

To make it easier on you, here is the search page for chemical queries.

http://www.ars-grin.gov/duke/highchem.html

I just searched boron at random, and found that Valerianella Locusta contains the most with 350 ppm.
 
D. Logan
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Thanks. I will be reading these over closely. This should certainly make it simpler. The idea seemed to make sense to me since I think it is wiser to amend the soil naturally as you are building it rather than waiting for the plants to grow. Once growing if you notice a deficiency, you are going to almost certainly have to use an outside input.
 
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